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I have data similar to the following in a csv file:

a,b,50
b,c,60
b,e,25
e,f,20
z,n,10
x,m,25
v,p,15

I'm attempting to use NetworkX and Matplotlib to graph the data, however my csv has far to many rows/nodes to make any sense out of the graph.

Here's the important part of the code that I'm using to plot:

import networkx as nx
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

G = nx.DiGraph()

f = open("test_data.csv", "r")

for line in f:
    node1, node2, weight1 = line.split(",")
    G.add_edge(node1, node2)

nx.draw(G)
plt.show()

For this sample data I end up with the following graph:

sample_plot

From this small sample it's easy to see that some nodes ([z,n],[x,m][v,p]) are trees with only two nodes. I would like to detect and eliminate these since I'm only concerned with trees greater than two nodes. I'm sure there are a number of ways to do, can anyone make a suggestion or give an example?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the networkX bellman_ford method to find the paths longer than a given minimum. For this you need a Digraph (or Graph) G with weights set to -1.

The following code is based on this thread.

import networkx as nx
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

data = (('a','b',50), ('b','c',60), ('b','e',25),
        ('e','f',20), ('z','n',10), ('x','m',25),
        ('v','p',15))

G = nx.DiGraph()
for node1, node2, weight1 in data:
    G.add_edge(node1, node2, weight=-1)

min_lenght = 2
F = nx.DiGraph()   #filtered graphs

# check all edges with bellman_ford
for u, v in G.edges():
    vals, distances = nx.bellman_ford(G, u)
    if min(distances.values()) < - min_lenght:
        for u, v in vals.items():
            if v:
                F.add_edge(v, u)

nx.draw(F)
plt.show()

This produces the only graph that complies the requirement:

enter image description here

Note that this is a simplification of a general method for determining the graph with a longest path (in terms of distance). So if you create the graph including weights you can apply bellman ford after changing the sign of the weights:

G = nx.DiGraph()
for node1, node2, weight1 in data:
    G.add_edge(node1, node2, weight=weight1)

min_lenght = 100  

H = nx.DiGraph(G)  # intermediate graph
# change sign of weights
for u, v in H.edges():
    H[u][v]['weight'] *= -1

# check all edges with bellman_ford
for u, v in G.edges():
    vals, distances = nx.bellman_ford(H, u)
    if min(distances.values()) < - min_lenght:
        #--- whatever ----
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Everyone gave some great answers, but for my particular needs @joaquin's answer was the best. And thank you for pointing out that it was the bellman_ford model so I can read more. –  secumind Dec 31 '12 at 16:23
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I don't know nx API so I won't solve this using the G digraph object, but using just dict

import networkx as nx
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

G = nx.DiGraph()

f = open("test_data.csv", "r")

blocs_by_node = {}
for line in f:
    node1, node2, weight1 = line.split(",")
    if node1 not in blocs_by_node and node2 not in blocs_by_node :
        bloc = [node1, node2]
        blocs_by_node[node1] = bloc
        blocs_by_node[node2] = bloc
    elif node1 not in blocs_by_node and node2 in blocs_by_node :
        bloc = blocs_by_node[node2]
        bloc.append(node1)
        blocs_by_node[node1] = bloc
    elif node1 in blocs_by_node and node2 not in blocs_by_node :
        bloc = blocs_by_node[node1]
        bloc.append(node2)
        blocs_by_node[node2] = bloc
    elif blocs_by_node[node1] is not blocs_by_node[node2] :
        bloc = blocs_by_node[node1]
        for node in blocs_by_node[node2] :
            bloc.append(node)
            blocs_by_node[node] = bloc

f.close()

f = open("test_data.csv", "r")

for line in f:
    node1, node2, weight1 = line.split(",")
    if len(blocs_by_node[node1]) > 2 :
        G.add_edge(node1, node2)

f.close()

nx.draw(G)
plt.show()

I read the file twice, you can refactor the code to read it once by storing the values in a list.

By the way, I expect the example's solution to contains :

[('a', 'b'), ('b', 'c'), ('b', 'e'), ('e', 'f')]
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For your specific case, try iterating through the edge list and query the graph whether the target nodes themselves have neighbors (eg, the target is a source in another edge). If the target contains no other neighbor, then that satisfies your criteria.

code:

for src, trg in G.edges():
    if G.neighbors(trg) == []:
        G.remove_edge(*(src,trg)) # Need the * to unpack the edge nodes

G should only contain the edges (a, b), (b, e): (See ipython output below)

In [35]: G.edges()
Out[35]: [('a', 'b'), ('b', 'e')]

Best of luck!

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