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I am just practising Java OOPs concepts by building a dummy project of Library management system.

Initially I had classes for Book, Customer, Administrator (with Customer, Administrator extending abstract user class) I then created list classes BookCollection, CustomerCollection which hold the list of instances of above classes in ArrayList (for a while am not dealing with databases) and perform add, delete, sort methods on corresponding ArrayList (just one inline question: will it be a good design practice if I replace ArrayList related code with database operation once I start dealing with database, with each xyzCollection dealing with xyzTable in database)

The main problem: Since I thought earlier that I will have to maintain only list of books, customers across app, I made ArrayLists static. Also, I wrote enough of static methods: addXyz, deleteXyz, searchXyz, sortXyz methods However now I realize that for search of Customers or Books I may have (or rather should) to return list of them matching the name, that means I have to return another ArrayList, which should be an instance of xyzCollection, however I cant use ArrayList in these xyzCollection as it is staic shared among all instances.

Initially it was appearing I will need shared ArrayList, but am now doubting my initial decision. What should be correct?:

  • Should I make ArrayList and corresponding methods non static and make any corresponding code changes at calls
  • Or should I return ArrayList instead of XyzCollection

What will be better in terms of code design? Or I have made definite mistake in making them all static?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume that you are creating collection books/customers after fetching data from DB. As you say its a library management system which means multiple users can use it simultaneously. And each request will be independent of other (like a typical distributed system).

So would suggest you to use normal class instead of static. You can use static for managing utilities like connection to db but not as placeholder like list of books/customers.

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+1 for "managing utilities like connection to db but not as placeholder like list of books/customers" Am thinking to make it private only and instantiating XyzCollection –  Mahesha999 Dec 31 '12 at 7:27
    
what about my inline question? –  Mahesha999 Dec 31 '12 at 8:15
    
my inline question above is: will it be a good design practice if I replace ArrayList related code with database operation once I start dealing with database, with each xyzCollection dealing with xyzTable in database, or should I go for re design (higlighted in in main question) –  Mahesha999 Dec 31 '12 at 8:45
    
Mapping xyzCollection with xyzTable is definitely one option and that's what ORM tools like Hibernate do. So you can follow this approach. Will suggest you to go through DAO design pattern. Through DAO you can abstract all your db operations and then return your collection. –  rai.skumar Dec 31 '12 at 8:51
    
You mean I should use JDBC, or there is any other specific one? –  Mahesha999 Dec 31 '12 at 9:33

In my thinking working with database would be much easy then using the concept of array list. As by using array you have to make it shared so that values can be accessed. As I don't know your conceptual design of making it so consider it just an opinion.

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ArrayList is not shared but private and all it manipulations are currently using static methods in xyzCollection, for eg. ArrayList<Book> is manipulated by static methods addBook(), deleteBook() in BookCollection, so no sharing of ArrayList as such it is currently private static inside BookCollection –  Mahesha999 Dec 31 '12 at 7:26

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