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What is runtime type control in C++?

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stackoverflow.com/questions/351845/… have a look at this –  yesraaj Sep 11 '09 at 10:15
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It enables you to identify the dynamic type of a object at run time. For example:

class A
{
   vurtual ~A();
};

class B : public A
{
}

void f(A* p)
{
  //b will be non-NULL only if dyanmic_cast succeeds
  B* b = dynamic_cast<B*>(p);
  if(b) //Type of the object is B
  {
  }
  else //type is A
  { 
  }
}

int main()
{
  A a;
  B b;

  f(&a);
  f(&b);
}
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It is not just about dynamic_cast, but the entire RTTI is part of it. The best place to learn about RTTI is section 15.4 of the C++ Programming Language by Bjarne Stroustrup

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It's dynamic_cast functionality - your code can detect at runtime if a given pointer or reference is really bound to an object of type you expect.

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The correct name of this is Run-time type information (RTTI).

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+1 I have never seen "lmgtfy" before =) Great resource, really =) –  SadSido Sep 11 '09 at 13:13
    
Please explain the downvotes made to this post. Downvoting without comments is not fair. –  RED SOFT ADAIR Sep 13 '09 at 8:48
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You can take a Interface* and "ask" c++ to what type of object the pointer points. To my knowledge, this relies on runtime meta information, that needs a few cycles for storing and searching such information.

Look at the "typeid" keyword. It provides the most magic.

dynamic_cast only uses RTTI, typeid with std::type_info seems to me more like the "real thing".

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