Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a memory which I use char * p to access it.

I want a reference to it. How do I make it?

vector<char>& v = p

What do I need to do instead of p to convert it to vector, I need also to tell it the size of the char * that I use in the memory.

share|improve this question
2  
It is not possible for a std::vector to use a reference to existing memory. You can reference the memory after the std::vector is created or you can initialize the std::vector with the contents of data in memory. –  Dietrich Epp Dec 31 '12 at 9:26
1  
What kind of vector do you want? What kind of data is at the pointed to location? It's hard to answer this question without more information but the most straight forward solution is probably to cast p to the correct type of pointer, and then construct a new vector using something like std::vector<char> wewvec(p,p+20) that is, if the data is really char. –  Johan Lundberg Dec 31 '12 at 9:28
    
What are you going to do with the reference? Why can't you just use p? Such as: p[3], ? –  Johan Lundberg Dec 31 '12 at 10:21
    
If a refernce to char *p is needed, you can make a reference to pointer like that: char *&ref = p; I suppose that there is a function that takes a reference to pointer just as in void function_a(int *& a) –  fatma.ekici Dec 31 '12 at 11:16
    
Is there a function that expects a reference? If a reference to char *p is needed, you can make a reference to pointer like that: char *&ref = p; I suppose that there is a function that takes a reference to pointer just as in void fun(char *& a). By this way if you call fun(p) your pointer will be passed by reference. If the function was something like void fun(char &a) you would call it as fun((*p)). –  fatma.ekici Dec 31 '12 at 11:24

3 Answers 3

It's hard to answer this question without more information but I'll try. The most straight forward solution is probably to cast p to the correct type of pointer, and then construct a new vector. If you want a vector of chars:

std::vector<char> wewvec(p,p+20) 

where 20 is where you'll give the number of element. That is, if the data is really char.

If the data is of some other type, say it contains 20 floats, you could do:

const float* pf=reinterpret_cast<const float*>(p);
std::vector<float> wewvec(pf,pf+20) 

As Dietrich writes, this will copy the data into the new vector.

share|improve this answer
    
1  
Thank you, that's embarrassing. should be reinterpret_cast. ideone.com/ox5Uxz –  Johan Lundberg Dec 31 '12 at 15:23

If you have a pointer p that points to a memory block

char* p = new char[100];

you can create a reference to it by writing

char& q = *p;

if you use the container vector you will need to copy the contents to the vector as Johan says

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I am trying to find a way without copying it –  Boris Raznikov Dec 31 '12 at 10:10
    
@Boris: That's a non-starter. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 31 '12 at 14:34

Essentially:

  • A vector owns its memory, it doesn't just reference it. So you can create a new vector which copies your data, but you cannot get the vector to "acquire" your pointer and use that.

  • If you have to have a vector to pass into a 3rd party API and you have a pointer, you will have to make a copy

  • If you are in control of the API, you could change it to take a range of pointers (begin / end) or a pointer and a size. This way, if you have a vector already you can still access these functions (albeit you cannot expect begin() and end() to give you pointers. But there are ways to get these as pointers using &v[0] and then adding the size to that pointer).

  • If you just need to put the data into standard algorithms, you can already do that with a pointer.

Obviously you cannot perform vector operations that modify the data size e.g. push_back if you have a pointer. But as you have a char* not a const char*, you can modify the members.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.