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I have four bool variables, say :

bool a=true;
bool b=false;
bool c=true;
bool d=false;

then I want to check that those four are equal. However;

Console.WriteLine(true == false == true == false);
true

Why is this happening? I think it is because of evalution order of an equation, which goes from left to right :

((true == false) == true) == false
(false == true) == false
false == false
true

then What is a proper way to check whether all N>2 boolean variables are equal?

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Your assumption is correct. If the same operator is used throughout an expression... operator precedence means nothing.. they are all the same.. –  Simon Whitehead Dec 31 '12 at 9:42
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

An obvious way would be to pair them and use .Equals() instead of ==


Check this alternative, it could be what you want - Equality comparison between multiple variables

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Thanks for the generic solution.. –  thkang Dec 31 '12 at 10:08
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if(a==b && a==c && a==d)

If you have variable number of bools not only 4

var bools = new bool[] { a, b, c, d };
var areAllEqual = bools.Skip(1).All(b=>b==bools[0]);
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+1 oops, you have already mentioned about the array (Also you can use a also instead of bools[0] since you already have the value ) –  V4Vendetta Dec 31 '12 at 9:48
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I guess you could add put them in an array and then use the All operator

yourboolarray.All(x=>x == a) // compare with any a,b,c,d
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you could consider using bitwise methods for this

where by the integer representation of the bools would equal 0 or 15 (or any value depending on number of bits)

may require some code restructuring though

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What? No. If you're going to convert them to ints, you may as well just count them. But really, values should be left in their 'natural' types, not cast like this. –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 31 '12 at 17:08
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