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I have created a class in JavaScript like this:

var Test = function(){
    this.element = null;
    this.init = function() {
        if(Test.html == "") {
            Test.loadHtml(this);
            return;
        }
        this.initElements();
        this.someMethodInternalCall();
    };
    this.initElements = function() {
        // append the loaded html to body
        // etc...
        this.element = $("some-element-contained-in-loaded-html-apended-to-body");
    }
    this.someMethodInternalCall = function() {
        this.element.css({some:style}); // works in this place
    }
    this.someMethodExternalCall = function() {
        this.element.css({some:style}); // dosn't work in this place
        // I mean here this.element is null. WHY?
    }
};
Test.html = "";
Test.loadHtml = function() {
    // load html content by an ajax request (jQuery $.ajax method)
    // and put it in Test.html
    // then recall the Test.init ethod
    return function(caller) {
        Test.html = // load html by ajax... etc...
        caller.init();
    };
}();

function someUsage(){
    var t = new Test();
    t.init();
    t.element.css({some:style}); // error: t.element is null WHY?
    t.someMethodExternalCall(); // error: this.element is null WHY?
}

As you can see, I explain in code above. Why when we set properties after their initialization, it just takes effects in internall calls? How can I create a property that I can change it's value?

UPDATE:

It seems that I have to explain my code. The probelem is all about element property, not Test.html nor Test.loadHtml method or calling it. Test.loadHtml get fired currectly (you can test it) and Test.html gets the loaded html and the loaded html get appended to body and so on. This is a JavaScript pattern (I forgot what is its name) and works currectly. The only thing that is wrong is about property initialization -element.

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closed as not a real question by apsillers, Jan Dvorak, François Wahl, Ed Heal, Graviton Jan 3 '13 at 3:52

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
what's this is your code? Test.html = ""; whenever the script will be executed then Test.html will equal to NULL... –  Muhammad Talha Akbar Dec 31 '12 at 14:02
    
Probelm is not with Test.html. It is about element. –  king.net Dec 31 '12 at 14:03
    
caller is not undefined. Please test code. It works until second call to element –  king.net Dec 31 '12 at 14:06
    
@apsillers +1 yes I got understand this after this problem. But question is how to handle that? I have tried var self = this; and working by self instead of this, but the problem exists –  king.net Dec 31 '12 at 14:17
1  
It would be very helpful if you could post a working example of your code on a site like jsfiddle.net. Your current code is not functional (e.g., there's some pseudocode and you use Text.loadHtml instead of Test.loadHtml), so it makes it difficult to troubleshoot your problem. –  apsillers Dec 31 '12 at 14:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem is asynchronicity. When you are going off to load the HTML via AJAX the rest of the function continues...

function someUsage(){
  var t = new Test();
  t.init();
  // The following carries on whilst the request is loading it does not wait
  t.element.css({some:style}); // This is why I am null
  t.someMethodExternalCall(); // This is why I am also null
}

To get around this you could use a callback...

function someUsage(){
  var t = new Test();
  t.init(function() {
    // I do not continue until the loadHtml request has completed
    t.element.css({some:style}); // I am not null anymore
    t.someMethodExternalCall(); // I am not null anymore
  });
}

You would need to modify your init function and your loadHtml function to call the callback rather than the init method of the caller object, the init function...

this.init = function(callback) {

  // Using blank Test.html to determine whether the html has been loaded
  if(Test.html == "") {
    var me = this;

    // Call loadHtml with a callback function
    Text.loadHtml(function() {

      // I want to keep the this reference to the object and callback argument
      me.init(callback);
    });

  // It is loaded so continue set up and then trigger the callback
  } else {
    this.initElements();
    this.someMethodInternalCall();
    callback();
  }
};

There would still cause a problem if you created a number of these Test classes as each would try to get the HTML whilst the others were loading.

To get around this you just need to have a flag that is set by the first call. Any subsequent calls are ignored but the callbacks are recorded to be called when the HTML finishes loading...

Test.loadHtml = function(callback) {

  // If already loading roll up callbacks
  if(Test.loading) {

    // Callback becomes a function that calls the original callback function 
    // and then the new one
    Test.callback = (function(original) {
      return function() {
        original();
        callback();
      }
    }) (Test.callback);

  // First time it has been called set the flag to prevent multiple loads 
  // and add the callback
  } else {
    Test.loading = true;
    Test.callback = callback;

    // Added to illustrate the AJAX callback functionality
    ajax("html", function(response) {
      Test.html = response;
      Test.callback();
    });
  }
}();

The preferred approach is to enforce object validity at instantiation time, this prevents these race conditions. You throw an error if the class cannot be constructed validly, this moves the complexity surrounding the order of your operations from the class. As you can see below it is not as pretty and you have to call the load step yourself (or have something else trigger it).

new Test(); // Errors not loaded!
// We must perform the load step to use the class
Test.load(function() {
  new Test(); // Works!
});

The more elegant solution, especially for large applications, involves managing access to the class. You cannot access the class without first performing the loading step, this enforces that loading will always complete before the class is instantiated.

// views is some object managing the loading of view classes when asked for
// one or more views it will load the required HTML and return the class(es)
// so we can create instances...
views.load("Test", function(Test) {
  var t = new Test();
  t.element.css({some: style});
  t.someMethodExternalCall();
});
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+1 and accept thanks a lot. cheers –  king.net Dec 31 '12 at 14:52
1  
No probs, glad it helped –  Stuart Wakefield Dec 31 '12 at 15:00

Are you doing caller.init(); in the callback of the ajax function in loadHtml?

If not, your init function will be added to the execution stack before your html is loaded (and that's why this.element is null)

Test.loadHtml = function() {
    // load html content by an ajax request (jQuery $.ajax method)
    // and put it in Test.html
    // then recall the Test.init ethod
    return function(caller) {
      $.ajax({
        url: 'somethinghere',
        success: function(data) {
            Test.html = data;
            caller.init();
        }
      });
    };
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