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I'm on Ubuntu 12.10 with OpenSSL 1.0.1c, python 2.7.3, Requests 1.0.3 and 1.0.4 (tried both), and when attempting to connect to the website in the url variable with the following code.

def SendInitialRequest(xmlmessage, redirecturl):
    url = 'https://centineltest.cardinalcommerce.com/maps/txns.asp'

    payload = 'cmpi_msg=' + ET.tostring(xmlmessage)
    headers = {
        'Content-Type': 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded',
    }
    r = requests.post(url, data=payload, headers=headers, verify=None)
    print r.text

It throws the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "clams/libs/centinel/thinclient.py", line 134, in SendInitialRequest
    r = requests.post(url, data=payload, headers=headers, verify=None)
  File "/home/jasonamyers/.virtualenv/clams/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/api.py", line 87, in post
    return request('post', url, data=data, **kwargs)
  File "/home/jasonamyers/.virtualenv/clams/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/api.py", line 44, in request
    return session.request(method=method, url=url, **kwargs)
  File "/home/jasonamyers/.virtualenv/clams/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/sessions.py", line 269, in request
    resp = self.send(prep, stream=stream, timeout=timeout, verify=verify, cert=cert, proxies=proxies)
  File "/home/jasonamyers/.virtualenv/clams/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/sessions.py", line 364, in send
    r = adapter.send(request, **kwargs)
  File "/home/jasonamyers/.virtualenv/clams/lib/python2.7/site-packages/requests/adapters.py", line 163, in send
    raise SSLError(e)
requests.exceptions.SSLError: [Errno 8] _ssl.c:504: EOF occurred in violation of protocol

Attempting the connection with openssl returns the following:

$ openssl s_client -connect centineltest.cardinalcommerce.com:443
CONNECTED(00000003)
140019346777760:error:140790E5:SSL routines:SSL23_WRITE:ssl handshake failure:s23_lib.c:177:
---
no peer certificate available
---
No client certificate CA names sent
---
SSL handshake has read 0 bytes and written 226 bytes
---
New, (NONE), Cipher is (NONE)
Secure Renegotiation IS NOT supported
Compression: NONE
Expansion: NONE
---

If I force it to use tls1 it works (output truncated):

$ openssl s_client -tls1 -connect centineltest.cardinalcommerce.com:443
CONNECTED(00000003)
depth=2 C = US, O = "thawte, Inc.", OU = Certification Services Division, OU
verify error:num=20:unable to get local issuer certificate
verify return:0
---

I've seen numerous bug reports for this; however, I've not found a way to get around it using the python requests library. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

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Did you install openssl through the package manager? If yes, did you check for updates? I can connect to this site using requests. –  Thomas Orozco Dec 31 '12 at 14:03
    
I did install openssl via the package manager, there are no updates. Can you share the versions of everything you are using? Also are you using the built in python or did you use pythonbrews etc to build your own? –  jasonamyers Dec 31 '12 at 14:05
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Reposting this here for others from the requests issue page

  • Lukasa commented 2 hours ago

Requests' does not support doing this before version 1. Subsequent to version 1, you are expected to subclass the HTTPAdapter, like so:

from requests.adapters import HTTPAdapter
from requests.packages.urllib3.poolmanager import PoolManager
import ssl

class MyAdapter(HTTPAdapter):
    def init_poolmanager(self, connections, maxsize, block=False):
        self.poolmanager = PoolManager(num_pools=connections,
                                       maxsize=maxsize,
                                       block=block,
                                       ssl_version=ssl.PROTOCOL_TLSv1)

When you've done that, you can do this:

import requests
s = requests.Session()
s.mount('https://', MyAdapter())

Any request through that session object will then use TLSv1.

Might have to write up some documentation for doing that. =)

EDIT: Authors note: I have not tried this code, I've only written it in here, so it might not be perfect.

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For the sake of keeping this answer up to date, I did end up writing this up here. The subclass API has changed a little bit since this answer was posted, so you should use the code in that blog post, not the code in this answer. =) –  Lukasa Sep 3 '13 at 9:05
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This is a known bug, you can work it around with a hack:

Open up site-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py (or otherwise just make a local copy of requests inside your own project), and change the block that says:

def connect(self):
    # Add certificate verification
    sock = socket.create_connection((self.host, self.port), self.timeout)

    # Wrap socket using verification with the root certs in
    # trusted_root_certs
    self.sock = ssl_wrap_socket(sock, self.key_file, self.cert_file,
                                cert_reqs=self.cert_reqs,
                                ca_certs=self.ca_certs,
                                server_hostname=self.host,
                                ssl_version=self.ssl_version)

to:

def connect(self):
    # Add certificate verification
    sock = socket.create_connection((self.host, self.port), self.timeout)

    # Wrap socket using verification with the root certs in
    # trusted_root_certs
    self.sock = ssl_wrap_socket(sock, self.key_file, self.cert_file,
                                cert_reqs=self.cert_reqs,
                                ca_certs=self.ca_certs,
                                server_hostname=self.host,
                                ssl_version=ssl.PROTOCOL_TLSv1)

Otherwise, I suppose there's an override somewhere which is less hacky, but I couldn't find one with a few glances.

NOTE: On a sidenote, requests from PIP (1.0.4) on a MacOS just works with the URL you provided.

share|improve this answer
    
I also had it work perfectly on MacOS, just worried about production, and that when Apple updates OpenSSL that might not always be the case. Thanks so much for the response. Gonna see if I'm actually allow to get a custom package like that pushed up to heroku :) –  jasonamyers Dec 31 '12 at 14:14
    
@jasonamyers: well, you can just make it a part of your project, just copy requests folder to your own project and import requests will prefer your patched version to the stock one. –  favoretti Dec 31 '12 at 14:22
    
really trying to avoid doing that for one connection out of many others :( I'll keep digging, thanks for the response. –  jasonamyers Dec 31 '12 at 14:38
    
I had another deeper look, there's no way ssl_version can be overriden from the top of requests module, without modifications to the module itself :( –  favoretti Dec 31 '12 at 14:50
    
This isn't an issue on Mac because they use OpenSSL 0.9.8r 8 Feb 2011, which hasn't implemented these changes yet. My guess is it's just a matter of time :( –  jasonamyers Dec 31 '12 at 15:04
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Unfortunately the accepted answer did not work for me. As a temporary workaround you could also use verify=False when connecting to the secure website.

From Python Requests throwing up SSLError

requests.get('https://example.com', verify=True)

would get ride of the

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I had the same issue: raise SSLError(e) requests.exceptions.SSLError: [Errno 8] _ssl.c:504: EOF occurred in violation of protocol

I had fiddler running, I stopped fiddler capture and did not see this error. Could be because of fiddler.

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I encountered this error, and the fix appears to be turning off SNI, which Python 2.7 does not support:

http://bugs.python.org/issue5639

urllib3 on python 2.7 SNI error on Google App Engine

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