Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to learn rails, and I've run into a bit of a problem.

I had an old sqlite3 database, and it has an Accounts table that I made earlier with some GUI program. I want to see if I can recreate that table with a database migration.

Here's the description of what I had previously (my goal):

-- desired
CREATE TABLE "accounts" (
  "id" INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT NOT NULL DEFAULT (0),
  "username" TEXT NOT NULL COLLATE NOCASE,
  "password_hash" BLOB NOT NULL,
  "creation_time" INTEGER NOT NULL DEFAULT(strftime('%s', 'now')),
  "expiration_time" INTEGER NOT NULL DEFAULT(strftime('%s', 'now') + 2592000)
)

My current migration code won't work properly. I read somewhere that I could use :options to specify things that ActiveRecord can't encapsulate, but I'm probably doing it wrong. When I used :default => Time.now.to_i, it just hardcoded some default values; and when I used :default => "strftime('%s', 'now')", it just didn't work at all.

class CreateAccounts < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :accounts do |t|
      t.column 'username', :text, :null => false, :options => 'COLLATE NOCASE'
      t.column 'password_hash', :binary, :null => false
      t.column 'creation_time', :integer, :null => false, :options => "DEFAULT(strftime('%s', 'now'))"
      t.column 'expiration_time', :integer, :null => false, :options => "DEFAULT(strftime('%s', 'now') + 2592000)"
    end
  end
end

I end up with the following table. It looks like all of the :option values were ignored.

-- what i actually get
CREATE TABLE "accounts" (
  "id" INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT NOT NULL,
  "username" text NOT NULL,
  "password_hash" blob NOT NULL,
  "creation_time" integer NOT NULL,
  "expiration_time" integer NOT NULL
)

How do I specify bits of SQL when creating columns? Any help would be very appreciated.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The easiest thing you can do is just execute the raw SQL to define the table. This would look something like:

class CreateAccounts < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    execute <<-SQL
    CREATE TABLE "accounts" (
      "id" INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT NOT NULL DEFAULT (0),
      "username" TEXT NOT NULL COLLATE NOCASE,
      "password_hash" BLOB NOT NULL,
      "creation_time" INTEGER NOT NULL DEFAULT(strftime('%s', 'now')),
      "expiration_time" INTEGER NOT NULL DEFAULT(strftime('%s', 'now') + 2592000)
    )
    SQL
  end

  def down
    remove_table :accounts
  end
end

This way you will end up with the same table you had before. I'm not completely sure if you can express such a table definition with the current migration DSL. You should be able to verify it though. If you have a migration with the raw SQL like the one above, you can run rake db:migrate. This should generate a new db/schema.rb. You can then open that file and search for the accounts table and look at the definition. If everything is included, you can copy that definition back into the migration.

share|improve this answer

The defaults are done as:

t.column :creation_time, :integer, :null => false, :default => "strftime('%s', 'now'))"

Collate and nocase cannot be done through ruby, but you can use the execute method to run raw sql:

execute "ALTER TABLE accounts ADD COLUMN username TEXT NOT NULL COLLATE NOCASE AFTER id

Alternatively, you could simply replace the collation with:

class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
  def username=(username)
    write_attribute :username, username.downcase
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
I tried using the :default => "strftime('%s', 'now'))" thing you suggested, but it just ends up as 0. "creation_time" integer DEFAULT 0 NOT NULL –  Neal P Jan 1 '13 at 1:10
    
My guess would be that it typecasts whatever you pass as the default to the column type. You'll probably just need to use execute for that one as well. –  sgrif Jan 2 '13 at 0:32

Your migration looks pretty good.

Since you do want to actually learn Rails I would stick with it and try to address the specific issues.

For rails, for created and updated date/time stamps what you do is create fields called updated_at and created_at (or _on for each) and then when rails uses active record to do a database table row update it will update those fields appropriately and automatically (or automagically as some would say).

This is a basic tenant of Rails - convention over configuration> Pick the right names and strictures and it will do the 'heavy-lifting' for you.

Your issue both using a default of now but it being hardcoded makes sense on reflection, but the above will address it

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.