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I have setup my classes like below. Hibernate ddl generates 2 tables Admin and Customer. I would have expected only one table as per the SINGLE_TABLE strategy.

@MappedSuperclass
public abstract class BaseUser{
...
}

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy=InheritanceType.SINGLE_TABLE)
public class Admin extends BaseUser{
...
}


@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy=InheritanceType.SINGLE_TABLE)
public class Customer extends BaseUser{
@OneToMany
private List<Order> orders;
...
}
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2 Answers 2

No, single-table inheritance works differently. The inheritance strategy needs to be defined on the super class. See the JPA Wikibook for reference.

@Entity
@Inheritance
@DiscriminatorColumn(name="USER_TYPE")
@Table(name="USER")
public abstract class BaseUser{
...
}

@Entity
@DiscriminatorValue("A")
public class Admin extends BaseUser{
...
}

@Entity
@DiscriminatorValue("C")
public class Customer extends BaseUser{
@OneToMany
private List<Order> orders;
...
}

Note that depending on your database you may or may not be allowed to call your table USER. There's also an example for how to use @MappedSuperclass.

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I dont think this is true...the subclasses should inherit the inheritance strategy. In any case this doesn't work either. –  DD. Dec 31 '12 at 14:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This seems to work all though unsure why @MappedSuperclass doesnt.

@Entity
@Inheritance
public abstract class BaseUser{
...
}

@Entity
public class Admin extends BaseUser{
...
}


@Entity
public class Customer extends BaseUser{
@OneToMany
private List<Order> orders;
...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I told you...it's essentially the same as what I posted (leaving out default configurations). Read up on the link I posted about @MappedSuperclass. It does the exact opposite of what you're after - having a separate table for each sub class (each with columns for the super class fields). –  Marcel Stör Dec 31 '12 at 16:53
    
No it's not. I tried your suggestion. I cannot get it to work using @MappedSuperclass even if I define it on the superclass. –  DD. Dec 31 '12 at 20:36
    
That must be a misunderstanding. The code in your question uses @MappedSuperclass which is wrong. My answer uses @Inheritance (and not @MappedSuperclass) to produce what you need. The reference in my answer to @MappedSuperclass is there to explain how to use it and why it's inappropriate for your scenario. –  Marcel Stör Dec 31 '12 at 22:39

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