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How do I inject the service manager into a Doctrine repository to allow me to retrieve the Doctrine Entity Manager?

I using the ZF2-Commons DoctrineORMModule and are trying to implement the repository example listed in the Doctrine Tutorial (bottom of tutorial in link below):

http://docs.doctrine-project.org/projects/doctrine-orm/en/latest/tutorials/getting-started.html

However, I keep getting a message "Fatal error: Call to a member function get() on a non-object in C:\zendProject\zf2 ... ", which suggests that I do not have a working instance of the service locator.

My Doctrine repository looks like this:

namespace Calendar\Repository;

use  Doctrine\ORM\EntityRepository,
     Calendar\Entity\Appointment,
     Calendar\Entity\Diary;

use Zend\ServiceManager\ServiceLocatorAwareInterface;
use Zend\ServiceManager\ServiceLocatorInterface;

class ApptRepository extends EntityRepository implements ServiceLocatorAwareInterface 
{
   protected $services;

   public function setServiceLocator(ServiceLocatorInterface $serviceLocator)
   {
       $this->services = $serviceLocator;
   }

   public function getServiceLocator()
   {
        return $this->services;
   }

  public function getUserApptsByDate()
  {
     $dql = "SELECT a FROM Appointment a";

     $em = $this->getServiceLocator()->get('Doctrine\ORM\EntityManager');

     $query = $em()->createQuery($dql);

     return $query->getResult();
   }
}

I then want to call this in my controller using the following pattern:

$diary = $em->getRepository('Calendar\Entity\Appointment')->getUserApptsByDate();

EDIT: The attached link suggests that I may need to convert the class to a service,
http://stackoverflow.com/a/13508799/1325365

However, if this is the best route, how would I then make my Doctrine Entity aware of the service. At the moment I include an annotation in the doc block pointing to the class.

@ORM\Entity (repositoryClass="Calendar\Repository\ApptRepository") 
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The way i approach things is this:

First i register a Service for each entity. This is done inside Module.php

public function getServiceConfig()
{
    return array(
        'factories' => array(
            'my-service-entityname' => 'My\Factory\EntitynameServiceFactory',
        )
    );
}

Next thing would be to create the factory class src\My\Factory\EntitynameServiceFactory.php. This is the part where you inject the EntityManager into your Entity-Services (not into the entity itself, the entity doesn't need this dependency at all)

This class looks something like this:

<?php
namespace My\Factory;

use Zend\ServiceManager\ServiceLocatorInterface;
use Zend\ServiceManager\FactoryInterface;
use My\Service\EntitynameService;

class EntitynameServiceFactory implements FactoryInterface
{
    public function createService(ServiceLocatorInterface $serviceLocator)
    {
        $service = new EntitynameService();
        $service->setEntityManager($serviceLocator->get('Doctrine\ORM\EntityManager'));
        return $service;
    }
}

Next thing in line is to create the src\My\Service\EntitynameService.php. And this is actually the part where you create all the getter functions and stuff. Personally i extend these Services from a global DoctrineEntityService i will first give you the code for the EntitynameService now. All this does is to actually get the correct repository!

<?php
namespace My\Service;

class EntitynameService extends DoctrineEntityService
{
    public function getEntityRepository()
    {
        if (null === $this->entityRepository) {
            $this->setEntityRepository($this->getEntityManager()->getRepository('My\Entity\Entityname'));
        }
        return $this->entityRepository;
    }
}

This part until here should be quite easy to understand (i hope), but that's not all too interesting yet. The magic is happening at the global DoctrineEntityService. And this is the code for that!

<?php
namespace My\Service;

use Zend\EventManager\EventManagerAwareInterface;
use Zend\EventManager\EventManagerInterface;
use Zend\ServiceManager\ServiceManagerAwareInterface;
use Zend\ServiceManager\ServiceManager;
use Doctrine\ORM\EntityManager;
use Doctrine\ORM\EntityRepository;

class DoctrineEntityService implements
    ServiceManagerAwareInterface,
    EventManagerAwareInterface
{
    protected $serviceManager;
    protected $eventManager;
    protected $entityManager;
    protected $entityRepository;


    /**
     * Returns all Entities
     *
     * @return EntityRepository
     */
    public function findAll()
    {
        $this->getEventManager()->trigger(__FUNCTION__ . '.pre', $this, array('entities' => $entities));
        $entities = $this->getEntityRepository()->findAll();
        $this->getEventManager()->trigger(__FUNCTION__ . '.post', $this, array('entities' => $entities));
        return $entities;
    }

    public function find($id) {
        return $this->getEntityRepository()->find($id);
    }

    public function findByQuery(\Closure $query)
    {
        $queryBuilder = $this->getEntityRepository()->createQueryBuilder('entity');
        $currentQuery = call_user_func($query, $queryBuilder);
       // \Zend\Debug\Debug::dump($currentQuery->getQuery());
        return $currentQuery->getQuery()->getResult();
    }

    /**
     * Persists and Entity into the Repository
     *
     * @param Entity $entity
     * @return Entity
     */
    public function persist($entity)
    {
        $this->getEventManager()->trigger(__FUNCTION__ . '.pre', $this, array('entity'=>$entity));
        $this->getEntityManager()->persist($entity);
        $this->getEntityManager()->flush();
        $this->getEventManager()->trigger(__FUNCTION__ . '.post', $this, array('entity'=>$entity));

        return $entity;
    }

    /**
     * @param \Doctrine\ORM\EntityRepository $entityRepository
     * @return \Haushaltportal\Service\DoctrineEntityService
     */
    public function setEntityRepository(EntityRepository $entityRepository)
    {
        $this->entityRepository = $entityRepository;
        return $this;
    }

    /**
     * @param EntityManager $entityManager
     * @return \Haushaltportal\Service\DoctrineEntityService
     */
    public function setEntityManager(EntityManager $entityManager)
    {
        $this->entityManager = $entityManager;
        return $this;
    }

    /**
     * @return EntityManager
     */
    public function getEntityManager()
    {
        return $this->entityManager;
    }

    /**
     * Inject an EventManager instance
     *
     * @param  EventManagerInterface $eventManager
     * @return \Haushaltportal\Service\DoctrineEntityService
     */
    public function setEventManager(EventManagerInterface $eventManager)
    {
        $this->eventManager = $eventManager;
        return $this;
    }

    /**
     * Retrieve the event manager
     * Lazy-loads an EventManager instance if none registered.
     *
     * @return EventManagerInterface
     */
    public function getEventManager()
    {
        return $this->eventManager;
    }

    /**
     * Set service manager
     *
     * @param ServiceManager $serviceManager
     * @return \Haushaltportal\Service\DoctrineEntityService
     */
    public function setServiceManager(ServiceManager $serviceManager)
    {
        $this->serviceManager = $serviceManager;
        return $this;
    }

    /**
     * Get service manager
     *
     * @return ServiceManager
     */
    public function getServiceManager()
    {
        return $this->serviceManager;
    }
}

So what does this do? This DoctrineEntityService pretty much is all what you globally need (to my current experience). It has the fincAll(), find($id) and the findByQuery($closure)

Your next question (hopefully) would only be "How to use this from my controller now?". It's as simple as to call your Service, that you have set up in the first step! Assume this code in your Controllers

public function someAction()
{
    /** @var $entityService \my\Service\EntitynameService */
    $entityService = $this->getServiceLocator()->get('my-service-entityname');

    // A query that finds all stuff
    $allEntities = $entityService->findAll();

    // A query that finds an ID 
    $idEntity = $entityService->find(1);

    // A query that finds entities based on a Query
    $queryEntity = $entityService->findByQuery(function($queryBuilder){
        /** @var $queryBuilder\Doctrine\DBAL\Query\QueryBuilder */
        return $queryBuilder->orderBy('entity.somekey', 'ASC'); 
    });
}

The function findByQuery() would expect an closure. The $queryBuilder (or however you want to name that variable, you can choose) will be an instance of \Doctrine\DBAL\Query\QueryBuilder. This will always be tied to ONE Repository though! Therefore entity.somekey the entity. will be whatever repository you are currently working with.

If you need access to the EntityManager you'd either only instantiate only the DoctrineEntityService or call the $entityService->getEntityManager() and continue from there.

I don't know if this approach is overly complex or something. When setting up a new Entity/EntityRepository, all you need to do is to add a new Factory and a new Service. Both of those are pretty much copy paste with two line change of code in each class.

I hope this has answered your question and given you some insight of how work with ZF2 can be organized.

share|improve this answer
    
Sam - this has taken a bit to work through, but this is a really great answer - thanks so much. One question what do the eventManager trigger calls do in the DoctrineEntityService persist method? Are these events I can use to trigger some other action? What do you use them for? –  Greg.Forbes Dec 31 '12 at 18:27
    
Sadly i can't even answer that question. Well i can, they fire an event with a name that has no action attached to it. So basically nothing happens. It's copy paste left-over... You could probably attach a CacheHandler to these events or something. I think this is covered somewhere at ZF2s QuickStart tutorial if im not mistaken –  Sam Jan 1 '13 at 2:21
    
This answer seems like overkill. There is no need to have a DoctrineEntityService or any of this stuff. Just get the doctrine EntityManager from the zf2 ServiceManager (or inject it with a factory) and use `$entityManager->getRepository('MyEntity'). Simpler, faster, and that's the way Doctrine is meant to be used. –  superdweebie Jan 1 '13 at 9:15
    
@superdweebie The all that Service does is to provide global functionality like findAll(), persist() etc. Sure you can do it all from the EntityManager itself, but i'd argue having some basic functionality encapsulated in one Base-Class is a good thing to do. Furthermore this entityService is written once. All sub-entities - as seen in the code-sample above, are just a few lines. –  Sam Jan 1 '13 at 16:46
    
@sam I understand what you are trying to do, but it's not how doctrine is meant to be. Long ago I PR'd a similar thing for DoctrineMongoODMModule, and got gently rejected, and stuff explained. Doctrine itself could offer more direct access to methods like find() on Repositories, but it doesn't in order to promote good separation of concerns and clear architecture - so it is clear about which code does what. Calling ->getRepository is not arduous, and it doesn't muddy Doctrine conventions like your solution does. –  superdweebie Jan 2 '13 at 10:48

As long as you extend the Doctrine\ORM\EntityRepository, you have immediate access to the entity manager by calling EntityRepository::getEntityManager() or the $_em attribute. The inheritence from the Doctrine\ORM\EntityRepository class allow you to do so.

Your method should now look like this:

public function getUserApptsByDate()
{
    $dql = "SELECT a FROM Appointment a";
    $em = $this->getEntityManager();// Or $em=$this->_em;
    $query = $em()->createQuery($dql);
    return $query->getResult();
}

I always keep in mind that access to my data should go from the web front (Zend MVC, Service Manager) to the persistence layer (Doctrine). My persistence (entities, repositories...) layer should not refer to the web front or neither know that it exists. If my system is doing the inverse at some level, then probably I'm doing something wrong.

Happy end of year

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this is a really simple solution. I had not considered trying to directly access the $em. I have gone the route of including this set of DB calls as a service given the calls will be used in a number of modules. I am still playing with the code, but this should allow me to simplify the code using the standard doctrine code format. –  Greg.Forbes Dec 31 '12 at 19:19
    
+1 for @yechabbi. I would like to add a link to the doctrine entity repository where you can see the entityManager as $_em at line 54. –  Wilt May 9 at 11:21

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