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window.onbeforeunload = function() {
    if (document.getElementById("parentpan").style.display == "block") {
        return "You are logged out.";
            Logout();
    }
};

I want the logout() function to be called after the return statement, is it possible?

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Why do you need them in that order? –  Blender Dec 31 '12 at 14:47
7  
technically returning "you are logged out." before logging someone out is lying :) –  Hunter McMillen Dec 31 '12 at 14:47
1  
You are returning "You are logged out." to a user with a ok/cancel prompt? The onbeforeunload does not act like window.confirm() –  epascarello Dec 31 '12 at 15:05

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The return statement ends a function, you cannot execute code after it. You could do this:

ret = "You are logged out.";
Logout();
return ret;
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You can't execute anything after a return statement.

edit: the finally statement allows code execution after a return for cleanup purposes.

(This is a good example for an XY-Question: You are asking about Y while never telling us for what X you actually need it).

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isn't there any trick? –  Faisal Amjad Dec 31 '12 at 14:44
    
no, there isn't. –  Femaref Dec 31 '12 at 14:45
    
@Femaref: Actually, there is. (finally) –  SLaks Dec 31 '12 at 14:49
    
@Femaref You might want to clarify; using timers, event handlers, etc., does allow you to put code in a function that will be executed chronologically after the function has returned. –  Stuart Dec 31 '12 at 15:00
    
@Stuart: That's something different than what I wrote - I wrote explicitly "after a return statement". Everything you specified are side-effects of a function and have no bearing on the return statement itself. –  Femaref Dec 31 '12 at 15:03

In general if you want something to be executed after the function has returned, you can set a timer:

function myFunction() {
    if (document.getElementById("parentpan").style.display == "block") {
        setTimeout(Logout, 50); // Logout will be called 50ms later
        return "You are logged out.";
    }
};

However, as noted in comments, this is not a good idea for onbeforeunload, as the timer event will not be fired if the page finished unloading first.

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Most modern day browsers will kill the timeout and ignore it when the page loads. Basically a race condition. –  epascarello Dec 31 '12 at 15:03
    
@epascarello - you mean "... when the page unloads", no? And, yeah, timers can not be relied on to fire as part of the page unloading. –  broofa Dec 31 '12 at 15:12

Most of the other answerers are missing what you are trying to do here. You want window.onbeforeunload to act like window.confirm(). There is no way to act on the ok action in the onbeforeunload event.

What you would have to do is hook it up on onunload to do the action.

window.onbeforeunload = function () { 
    return "Your session will be logged out" 
};
window.onunload = function () { 
    logout(); 
}

Problem with this is modern day browsers will kill a lot of processes that run in unload/beforeunload to "speed up" the browser so it is faster. So if it is asynchronous, you will have a race condition.

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Thanks @Shmiddty for fixing that, I do not think my morning coffee still has not kicked in. :) –  epascarello Dec 31 '12 at 18:22
    
No problem, mate. :) –  Shmiddty Dec 31 '12 at 18:24

I'm guessing that Logout is a time-intensive process and you want to provide feedback to the user before executing it:

setTimeout(Logout,1);
return "You are logged out.";
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return means you are returning from the execution of the called function.When return statement is executed, system understands that the function execution is over and it will switch to the main program from which the function is called.

In the program, you can see a statement after return.But the system wont check that even.

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What you need is to execute Logout asynchronously. This can be easily achieve in JavaScript by using the setTimeout function as others have said. Here's a method I commonly use to call functions asynchronously:

Function.prototype.async = function () {
    setTimeout.bind(null, this, 0).apply(null, arguments);
};

This method pushes a function call onto the event loop immediately (after 0 ms). Hence the function is executed after the current code completes (which for you is after you return). Here's a simple example of how to use it:

alert.async("This will be displayed later.");
alert("This will be displayed first.");

Since the first alert is called asynchronously it will execute after the second call to alert. As simple as preceding your function call with async. This is what you would do in your case:

window.onbeforeunload = function () {
    if (document.getElementById("parentpan").style.display === "block") {
        Logout.async();
        return "You are logged out.";
    }
};

What's the disadvantage? Since the function is blocked on the event loop it may never get the chance to execute (hence the user will never logout). Such a situation may arise. It usually occurs when the control goes into an infinite loop, or hangs because of a blocking AJAX request.

Good news for you however, this happens on a very rare occasion. So don't worry about it. Just use setTimeout like everyone else is bantering you to and you'll do just fine. Personally I think you should log out before returning a message that "You are logged out.", but it's your application.

Happy New Year. Cheers!

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If you have jquery in your project you can use defered mechanism. You can return promise object for ongoing tasks like this :

function task() {

   var defered = $.Deferred();
   setTimeout(defered.resolve , 5000);
   return defered.promise();

}  

function task2() {

   var defered = $.Deferred();
   setTimeout(defered.resolve , 10000);
   return defered.promise();
}   

function run() {
     return $.when(task(),task2());
}

var promise = run();

promise.done(function(){        
      alert("All tasks has been completed");        
});

Demo

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