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I am trying to implement a custom queue for Gstreamer buffers. The problem is that when I try to dequeue, it seems that I am loosing the head of the queue. Whenever I try to dequeue twice, I get a segmentation fault. I have also noticed that head is always equal than head->next. Now I'm not sure if there's something wrong with enqueue or dequeue. Please help me out. Thank you.

typedef struct _GstBUFFERQUEUE GstBufferQueue;

struct _GstBUFFERQUEUE {
  GstBuffer *buf;
  guint buf_size;
  struct _GstBUFFERQUEUE *next;
};

void enqueue_gstbuffer(GstBufferQueue **head, GstBufferQueue **tail, guint *queue_size, GstBuffer *buf)
{
  if (*queue_size == 0)
  {
    *head = malloc(sizeof(GstBufferQueue));
    (*head)->buf = gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc (GST_BUFFER_SIZE(buf));
    (*head)->buf = gst_buffer_copy(buf); 
    *tail = *head;
  }
  else
  {
    if ((*tail)->next = malloc(sizeof(GstBufferQueue))) {
        (*tail)->next->buf = gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc (GST_BUFFER_SIZE(buf));
        (*tail)->next->buf = gst_buffer_copy(buf);
        (*tail) = (*tail)->next;
    }
    else {
        GST_WARNING("Error allocating memory for new buffer in queue");
    } 
  } 
  (*tail)->next = NULL; 
  (*queue_size)++;

}

void dequeue_gstbuffer(GstBufferQueue **head, GstBufferQueue **tail, guint *queue_size, GstBuffer **buf)
{
  GstBufferQueue **tmpPtr = head;
  GstBufferQueue **nextPtr;
  *nextPtr = (*head)->next; 
  *buf = gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc (GST_BUFFER_SIZE((*tmpPtr)->buf));
  *buf = gst_buffer_copy((*tmpPtr)->buf);
  gst_buffer_unref((*tmpPtr)->buf);
  free((*tmpPtr));
  *head = *nextPtr;

  if ((*head) == NULL)
     (*tail) = NULL;

   (*queue_size)--;   
}
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closed as too localized by Oli Charlesworth, WhozCraig, Lars Kotthoff, Ram kiran, user97693321 Jan 2 '13 at 4:15

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Queue code is tricky. I've done it maybe a dozen times, and every time, no matter how careful I am, I seem to overlook some scenario. You just have to do your best (plan it well!), then write test cases to work out the bugs. –  Hot Licks Dec 31 '12 at 15:29
    
I would check size first to make sure there are items in the queue (NULL->next would likely be a segmentation fault). If there are not, that could be an issues. If there are no items, I would set *buf = NULL to return a null pointer for indicating there is not data, or return a value to indicate if the dequeue operation was successful or not. –  Glenn Dec 31 '12 at 15:33
2  
Please first use a debugger (or print statements) to isolate your problem, before posting to stack overflow! ;) –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 31 '12 at 16:09
    
I don't think this is the right approach to implement a queue. Gimme a second, I'll try to dig some of my queues... –  davak Dec 31 '12 at 17:02
    
OK. Seems Jonathan Leffler fixed your code, there is no point in posting mine. –  davak Dec 31 '12 at 17:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Replace

GstBufferQueue **nextPtr;
*nextPtr = (*head)->next;
...
*head = *nextPtr;

By

GstBufferQueue *nextPtr;
nextPtr = (*head)->next;
...
*head = nextPtr;
share|improve this answer
    
Great quick fix. Thanks! –  dead_jake Jan 2 '13 at 14:04

When converted to compilable code by adding enough pseudo-infrastructure to simulate the GST system, GCC comes up with a warning that's almost surely the source of your trouble:

gstq.c: In function ‘dequeue_gstbuffer’:
gstq.c:73:12: warning: ‘nextPtr’ is used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]

The lines are:

72  GstBufferQueue **nextPtr;
73  *nextPtr = (*head)->next;

On these lines, you need:

GstBufferQueue *nextPtr = (*head)->next;

You also need to use:

(*head)->next = nextPtr;

Pay attention to your compiler warnings. If your compiler doesn't warn, make it do so. If you can't make it warn, get a better compiler.


SSCCE

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

#define GST_BUFFER_SIZE(x)  sizeof(x)
#define GST_WARNING(x)      fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", x)

typedef struct GstBuffer { int value; } GstBuffer;
typedef unsigned int guint;

static GstBuffer *gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc(int size)
{
    GstBuffer *buf = malloc(sizeof(GstBuffer));
    assert(buf != 0);
    buf->value = size;
    return buf;
}

static GstBuffer *gst_buffer_copy(const GstBuffer *buf)
{
    GstBuffer *new_buf = malloc(sizeof(GstBuffer));
    assert(new_buf != 0);
    new_buf->value = buf->value;
    return new_buf;
}

static void gst_buffer_unref(GstBuffer *buf)
{
    buf->value = -1;
}

typedef struct _GstBUFFERQUEUE GstBufferQueue;

struct _GstBUFFERQUEUE {
  GstBuffer *buf;
  guint buf_size;
  struct _GstBUFFERQUEUE *next;
};

extern void enqueue_gstbuffer(GstBufferQueue **head, GstBufferQueue **tail, guint *queue_size, GstBuffer *buf);
extern void dequeue_gstbuffer(GstBufferQueue **head, GstBufferQueue **tail, guint *queue_size, GstBuffer **buf);

void enqueue_gstbuffer(GstBufferQueue **head, GstBufferQueue **tail, guint *queue_size, GstBuffer *buf)
{
  if (*queue_size == 0)
  {
    *head = malloc(sizeof(GstBufferQueue));
    (*head)->buf = gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc(GST_BUFFER_SIZE(buf));
    (*head)->buf = gst_buffer_copy(buf); 
    *tail = *head;
  }
  else
  {
    if (((*tail)->next = malloc(sizeof(GstBufferQueue))) != 0)
    {
        (*tail)->next->buf = gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc(GST_BUFFER_SIZE(buf));
        (*tail)->next->buf = gst_buffer_copy(buf);
        (*tail) = (*tail)->next;
    }
    else
    {
        GST_WARNING("Error allocating memory for new buffer in queue");
    } 
  } 
  (*tail)->next = NULL; 
  (*queue_size)++;
}

void dequeue_gstbuffer(GstBufferQueue **head, GstBufferQueue **tail, guint *queue_size, GstBuffer **buf)
{
  GstBufferQueue **tmpPtr = head;
  GstBufferQueue  *nextPtr;
  nextPtr = (*head)->next; 
  *buf = gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc (GST_BUFFER_SIZE((*tmpPtr)->buf));
  *buf = gst_buffer_copy((*tmpPtr)->buf);
  gst_buffer_unref((*tmpPtr)->buf);
  free((*tmpPtr));
  *head = nextPtr;

  if ((*head) == NULL)
     (*tail) = NULL;

   (*queue_size)--;   
}

int main(void)
{
    GstBufferQueue *q_head = 0;
    GstBufferQueue *q_tail = 0;
    guint           q_size = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        GstBuffer *buf = gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc(i + 100);
        enqueue_gstbuffer(&q_head, &q_tail, &q_size, buf);
        printf("EQ: %d\n", buf->value);
        free(buf);
        if (i % 2 == 1)
        {
            GstBuffer *buf;
            dequeue_gstbuffer(&q_head, &q_tail, &q_size, &buf);
            printf("DQ: %d\n", buf->value);
            free(buf);
        }
    }

    while (q_size > 0)
    {
        GstBuffer *buf;
        dequeue_gstbuffer(&q_head, &q_tail, &q_size, &buf);
        printf("DQ: %d\n", buf->value);
        free(buf);
    }

    printf("All done\n");
    return(0);
}

Output

EQ: 100
EQ: 101
DQ: 100
EQ: 102
EQ: 103
DQ: 101
EQ: 104
EQ: 105
DQ: 102
EQ: 106
EQ: 107
DQ: 103
EQ: 108
EQ: 109
DQ: 104
DQ: 105
DQ: 106
DQ: 107
DQ: 108
DQ: 109
All done

Note that the SSCCE code above leaks worse than a sieve. I've no plans to fix the leakages because they're in the code that simulates GST buffer management. Do check that your code does not suffer from the memory leaks.


I think you should be packaging your 'queue' differently. What you call a GstBufferQueue should really be a GstBufferQueueItem, and your actual GstBufferQueue should contain the head and tail pointers, and the size. You'd pass a pointer to the (revised) GstBufferQueue to the enqueue_gstbuffer() and dequeue_gstbuffer() functions, instead of passing 3 separate parameters.

typedef struct GstBufferQueueItem GstBufferQueueItem;

struct GstBufferQueueItem
{
  GstBuffer *buf;
  guint buf_size;
  GstBufferQueueItem *next;
};

typedef struct GstBufferQueue GstBufferQueue;

struct GstBufferQueue
{
    GstBufferQueueItem *head;
    GstBufferQueueItem *tail;
    guint               size;
};

// Uncompiled - but to give you an idea
void dequeue_gstbuffer(GstBufferQueue *q, GstBuffer **buf)
{
    GstBufferQueueItem *item = q->head;
    GstBufferQueueItem *next = item->next; 
    *buf = gst_buffer_try_new_and_alloc(GST_BUFFER_SIZE(item->buf));
    *buf = gst_buffer_copy(item->buf);
    gst_buffer_unref(item->buf);
    free(item);
    q->head = next;

    if (q->head == NULL)
        q->tail = NULL;

    q->size--;   
}

Note that these names avoid a leading underscore. Such names are dangerous. Names with underscore and an upper-case letter are reserved for the implementation for any purpose. Names with an underscore and a lower-case letter are reserved with different words, but using either is dodgy (and although the standards say little about underscore and a digit, don't play games with them — treat leading underscore as 'reserved for the system' unless you're writing 'the system').

ISO/IEC 9899:2011 §7.1.3 Reserved identifiers

  • All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use.
  • All identifiers that begin with an underscore are always reserved for use as identifiers with file scope in both the ordinary and tag name spaces.
share|improve this answer
    
comprehensive and thorough. I don't actually understand why this wasn't the accepted answer. +1 –  davak Jan 2 '13 at 10:26

One thing that stands out to me is when you allocate the queue for the first time (when *queue_size == 0 ) you are not setting the newly created node's 'next' pointer to NULL.

There is no guarantee that it will be NULL after the allocation and assignment to (*head), so when you do the dequeue your (*head)->next might be pointing to a garbage address.

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