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I want to convert an integer to binary string and then store each bit of the integer string to an element of a integer array of a given size. I am sure that the input integer's binary expression won't exceed the size of the array specified. How to do this in c++?

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Why would you want to do that? Ints are already natively an "array of bits", you can access each bit. –  Mat Dec 31 '12 at 17:09
1  
A "Binary string"? As in characters of 1s and 0s? What a strange task... –  Mooing Duck Dec 31 '12 at 17:09
    
@Mat: reread the question, he wants to convert an integer into an array of int, where each integer in the array holds a bit from the original integer. –  Mooing Duck Dec 31 '12 at 17:10
1  
@MooingDuck: I understand. That's like a 32x or 64x storage increase. Doesn't change my question. –  Mat Dec 31 '12 at 17:12
1  
LSB first or last in the array? –  James Dec 31 '12 at 17:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pseudo code:

int theValue = ????
int i;

for (i = 0; i < 32; ++i) {  // assuming a 32 bit int
    array[i] = theValue & (1 << i) ? 1 : 0;
}
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2  
Why not array[i] = (theValue >> i) & 1 - I'm sure the compiler does the same thing, but seeing that "there isn't going to be a branch in there" makes me happier. –  Mats Petersson Dec 31 '12 at 17:23
3  
<sarcasm>The question is tagged as C++ and so you must use templates, otherwise it's C. </sarcasm> –  James Dec 31 '12 at 17:24
template<class output_iterator>
void convert_number_to_array_of_digits(const unsigned number, 
         output_iterator first, output_iterator last) 
{
    const unsigned number_bits = CHAR_BIT*sizeof(int);
    //extract bits one at a time
    for(unsigned i=0; i<number_bits && first!=last; ++i) {
        const unsigned shift_amount = number_bits-i-1;
        const unsigned this_bit = (number>>shift_amount)&1;
        *first = this_bit;
        ++first;
    }
    //pad the rest with zeros
    while(first != last) {
        *first = 0;
        ++first;
    }
}

int main() {
    int number = 413523152;
    int array[32];
    convert_number_to_array_of_digits(number, std::begin(array), std::end(array));
    for(int i=0; i<32; ++i)
        std::cout << array[i] << ' ';
}

Proof of compilation here

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Don't you mean (number >> i) & 1? –  James Dec 31 '12 at 17:19
1  
@James: Thanks. First I posted code, then I posted code that compiles, and now it compiles and executes and seems to be working. –  Mooing Duck Dec 31 '12 at 17:22

You could use C++'s bitset library, as follows.

#include<iostream>
#include<bitset>

int main()
{
  int N;//input number in base 10
  cin>>N;
  int O[32];//The output array
  bitset<32> A=N;//A will hold the binary representation of N 
  for(int i=0,j=31;i<32;i++,j--)
  {
     //Assigning the bits one by one.
     O[i]=A[j];
  }
  return 0;
}

A couple of points to note here: First, 32 in the bitset declaration statement tells the compiler that you want 32 bits to represent your number, so even if your number takes fewer bits to represent, the bitset variable will have 32 bits, possibly with many leading zeroes. Second, bitset is a really flexible way of handling binary, you can give a string as its input or a number, and again you can use the bitset as an array or as a string.It's a really handy library. You can print out the bitset variable A as cout<<A; and see how it works.

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1  
Well that's a good idea. +1 even though it competes with mine. But why do you only support 21 digits? Why not 32? –  Mooing Duck Dec 31 '12 at 17:41
    
Okay let's make it 32 then. –  Aravind Dec 31 '12 at 17:47

You can do like this:

while (input != 0) {

        if (input & 1)
            result[index] = 1; 
        else
            result[index] =0;
   input >>= 1;// dividing by two
   index++;
}
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1  
I don't think that's quite right... (1) you never appear to change index, (2) even then it's still wrong. –  Mooing Duck Dec 31 '12 at 17:24
    
still not quite there I think –  Mooing Duck Dec 31 '12 at 17:39

As Mat mentioned above, an int is already a bit-vector (using bitwise operations, you can check each bit). So, you can simply try something like this:

// Note: This depends on the endianess of your machine
int x = 0xdeadbeef; // Your integer?
int arr[sizeof(int)*CHAR_BIT];
for(int i = 0 ; i < sizeof(int)*CHAR_BIT ; ++i) {
  arr[i] = (x & (0x01 << i)) ? 1 : 0; // Take the i-th bit
}
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Please use CHAR_BIT instead of the magic number 8. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 31 '12 at 17:16
    
Made the correction - thanks ;) (always forget about CHAR_BIT) –  RageD Dec 31 '12 at 17:17

Decimal to Binary: Size independent

Two ways: both stores binary represent into a dynamic allocated array bits (in msh to lsh).

First Method:

#include<limits.h> // include for CHAR_BIT
int* binary(int dec){
  int* bits = calloc(sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT, sizeof(int));
  if(bits == NULL) return NULL;
  int i = 0;

  // conversion
  int left = sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT - 1; 
  for(i = 0; left >= 0; left--, i++){
    bits[i] = !!(dec & ( 1u << left ));      
  }

  return bits;
}

Second Method:

#include<limits.h> // include for CHAR_BIT
int* binary(unsigned int num)
{
   unsigned int mask = 1u << ((sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT) - 1);   
                      //mask = 1000 0000 0000 0000
   int* bits = calloc(sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT, sizeof(int));
   if(bits == NULL) return NULL;
   int i = 0;

   //conversion 
   while(mask > 0){
     if((num & mask) == 0 )
         bits[i] = 0;
     else
         bits[i] = 1;
     mask = mask >> 1 ;  // Right Shift 
     i++;
   }

   return bits;
}
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I know it doesn't add as many Zero's as you wish for positive numbers. But for negative binary numbers, it works pretty well.. I just wanted to post a solution for once :)

int BinToDec(int Value, int Padding = 8)
{
    int Bin = 0;

    for (int I = 1, Pos = 1; I < (Padding + 1); ++I, Pos *= 10)
    {
        Bin += ((Value >> I - 1) & 1) * Pos;
    }
    return Bin;
}
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