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I have defined a new typedef as follows:

typedef struct matrep
{
       int rows, columns; /*rows/columns represent the number of rows/columns in the matrix, data represents matrix entries.*/
       double *data;
} 
       MATRIX;

Now, what I am trying to do is fill this structure with random double values, using a function gen_matrix. gen_matrix takes a pointer to a MATRIX structure and returns the same.

However, I obtain runtime errors when I execute my program below.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

typedef struct matrep
{
       int rows, columns; //rows and columns represent the number of columns in the matrix, data represents matrix entries.//
       double *data;
} 
       MATRIX; 

double random();
MATRIX *gen_matrix(MATRIX *ptr);

int main()
{
  MATRIX *somepointer;

  somepointer -> rows = 2;  //The program crashes when I try to execute this.//
  somepointer -> columns = 2;

}

double random()
{
       double f = (double)rand() / RAND_MAX; //Generating a random number between -100 and 100//
       return (-100 + f*(200));         
}

MATRIX *gen_matrix(MATRIX *ptr)
{
       int i, j;
       int m, n;     
       MATRIX *newdata;

       m = ptr -> rows;
       n = ptr -> columns;

       newdata = (MATRIX *)malloc(sizeof(double)*(m*n)); //Allocating suitable space.//
       ptr = newdata;

       for(i = 0; i < m; i++)
       {
             for(j = 0; j < n; j++)
             {
                *(ptr -> data)= random(); //Setting the value of each and every matrix entry to a random double.//
                 (ptr -> data)++; 
             }

       }

       return ptr;
}

I think there are two problems: 1: For some reason setting values of "rows" and "columns" in main() as above is wrong. 2: There could be some problem with my gen_matrix function also.

So my question is, how would I rectify both problems? (Note: my random() function is definitely ok).

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, Jonathan Leffler, Dharmendra, SztupY, Graviton Jan 3 '13 at 3:52

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1  
I would recommend looking into the GNU GSL source code which does exactly this, its matrix library is implemented using a struct gnu.org/software/gsl/manual/html_node/Matrices.html –  pyCthon Dec 31 '12 at 17:28
1  
You have declared a pointer without initialising it, and then attempted to dereference it. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 31 '12 at 17:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are several problems in your code, here are some of them:

  1. You're accesing the somepointer pointer variable without been initialized, that's the cause of the first crash, change your main routine for something like the following:

    int main() {
        MATRIX *somepointer = (MATRIX*) malloc(sizeof(MATRIX));
        somepointer -> rows = 2;  
        somepointer -> columns = 2;
    
        MATRIX *another_matrix = gen_matrix(somepointer);
    
        // Don't forget to free your stuff
        free(somepointer);
        free(another_matrix);
    }
    
  2. Change the memory assignation in the gen_matrix function to avoid a future crash.

    // Here do another malloc to avoid another access without initialization crash
    MATRIX *newdata = (MATRIX*) malloc(sizeof(MATRIX));
    
    m = ptr -> rows;
    n = ptr -> columns;
    
    newdata->data = (double*) malloc(sizeof(double) * (m * n)); 
    ptr = newdata;
    
  3. Your array initialization loop increments the data pointer, wich is incorrect, because at the end of the loop, the pointer will point to the last element of the data. You could access the array elements using pointer arithmetic, calculate the memory index based in the array [col, row] position:

    for(i = 0; i < m; i++)
       for(j = 0; j < n; j++) {
          // Memory address for array position i, j formula:
          // array-base-position + (total-colums * current-row) + current-col
          // example: given total-colums = 5, current-row = 1 and current-col = 3
          // you'll get:  ptr + (5 * 1) + 4 = 8
          // 
          //  ptr
          //  v
          //  ---------------------
          //  | 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 |
          //  ---------------------
          //  | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 |
          //  ---------------------
          //  ...           ^ here 
    
          *(ptr -> data + (n * i) + j) = random();
       }
    }
    
  4. A suggestion, rename your random function to something like drandom so it won't create ambiguity with the long int random() declared in stdlib.h (gcc version 4.6.3).

Another suggestion is to turn the warnings of your compiler on, so you can detect some of this issues beforehand

Update: The program with all of the above corrections applied. (It runs without crash using gcc version 4.6.3.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

typedef struct matrep {
    int rows, columns;
    double *data;
} MATRIX;

double drandom();
MATRIX *gen_matrix(MATRIX *ptr);

int main() {
    MATRIX *somepointer  = (MATRIX*) malloc(sizeof(MATRIX));
    somepointer->rows = 2;
    somepointer->columns = 2;

    MATRIX *another_matrix = gen_matrix(somepointer);

    free(somepointer);
    free(another_matrix->data);
    free(another_matrix);
}

double drandom() {
    double f = (double) rand() / RAND_MAX;
    return (-100 + f*(200));
}

MATRIX *gen_matrix(MATRIX *ptr) {
    MATRIX *newdata = (MATRIX*) malloc(sizeof(MATRIX));
    int nrows = ptr->rows;
    int ncols = ptr->columns;

    newdata->data = (double*) malloc(sizeof(double) * (nrows * ncols));
    for(int row = 0; row < nrows; row++) {
        for(int col = 0; col < ncols; col++) {
            *(newdata->data + (ncols * row) + col) = drandom();
        }
    }
    return newdata;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks h3nr1x, this is very helpful. I think that there is a small error in your "*(ptr -> data + (n * i) + j)= drandom();" line though, because the program crashes when I run it (and it runs fine without this line). Could it be a syntax issue? –  user1763115 Dec 31 '12 at 18:35
    
I ran the program but I didn't get a crash. Is the ptr->data pointer initialized correctly? Anyway, I posted the code with the suggestions above, please test it –  higuaro Dec 31 '12 at 19:15
    
The code runs fine now, I had defined my "newdata->data" wrongly. That should set me on the right track now, thank you for your help! –  user1763115 Dec 31 '12 at 19:28
    
You're welcome! –  higuaro Dec 31 '12 at 21:45

You have some errors, one of them is that you are allocating space in wrong way, type of newdata is MATRIX not double, change this to:

newdata = malloc(sizeof(*newdata));
newdata->data = malloc(sizeof(double)*(m*n));

And don't cast malloc ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I changed the code as you suggested, however the compiler is telling me that there is an error with your code? If I initialize "newdata" as a MATRIX, it's telling me that there is a problem because malloc returns a void*, however if I declare "newdata" as a void* then I also get problems. –  user1763115 Dec 31 '12 at 17:49
    
See @oli answer, in main() MATRIX must be MATRIX somepointer; or MATRIX *somepointer = malloc(sizeof(*somepointer)); –  Alter Mann Dec 31 '12 at 17:53