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I have this complex query which produces 3744 rows in about 50ms.

 SELECT 
  srl.event_id as eid
 , srl.race_num as rnum
 , bts.boat_id as bid_id
 , srl.series_year as yr
 , srl.id as id 
 , IFNULL(rfi.fleet,fleet_def) as flt_old,flt_match,s.series_id as sid
 , s.series_year as syr
  ,IFNULL(ovr_pts,POINTS('4',IFNULL(ovr_place,place),num_start)) as points

 FROM

 (SELECT en1.boat_id,en1.boat_name,MAX(fleet) as fleet_def FROM entries en1 
 JOIN series_race_list srl1 ON srl1.event_id=en1.event_id 
              AND srl1.series_year=en1.race_year 
 LEFT JOIN entries_race er1 ON en1.boat_id= er1.boat_id 
                           AND srl1.event_id=en1.event_id      
                           AND srl1.series_year =en1.race_year 
 WHERE srl1.series_id ='3' AND srl1.series_year ='2012' 
                            AND en1.entry_deleted='N'      
 GROUP BY boat_id) bts 

 JOIN series_race_list srl LEFT JOIN series as s ON s.series_id=srl.series_id 
 AND s.series_year =srl.series_year 

 LEFT JOIN entries as en ON srl.event_id=en.event_id 
  AND srl.series_year =en.race_year AND bts.boat_id =en.boat_id 

 LEFT JOIN entries_race er ON er.race_id= srl.event_id AND er.race_num=srl.race_num 
                        AND er.yr = srl.series_year AND bts.boat_id =er.boat_id

 LEFT JOIN event_race_info as eri ON eri.race_id= srl.event_id 
     AND eri.race_num=srl.race_num AND eri.yr = srl.series_year 
     ANd er.line=eri.line     AND status REGEXP 'prelim|final' 

 LEFT JOIN race_results as rr ON srl.event_id=rr.race_id 
     AND srl.race_num= rr.race_num   AND srl.series_year =rr.yr 
     AND bts.boat_id= rr.boat_id AND checked_in='Y' 

LEFT JOIN race_fleet_info as rfi ON rfi.race_id= srl.event_id 
     AND rfi.yr=srl.series_year AND srl.race_num= rfi.race_num 
     AND rfi.fleet=rr.flt AND complete='Y'

LEFT JOIN series_pts_override as spo ON srl.id =spo.id AND en.boat_id =spo.bid

WHERE s.series_id ='3' AND s.series_year ='2012' AND approved ='Y'

Sorry for the length. As I said this query executes in around 50ms. Now I want to use this data and perform queries on this 3744 row result. As soon I as wrap this with a query like

SELECT eid FROM(
     ......previous query here.....
         ) data

The execution time goes from 50 ms to 2.5 sec Ouch!

I tried creating a temporary table, That was the same. (Actually this is my preferred approach since I will need to do a few different queries on this results set.

Reading on this site I don't think this is a correlated sub query but is seems to be acting like one.

Seems like the act of creating a alias table is my issues, since the sub query has a derived table alias and the temp table is obviously a table.

How can I get access to these 3744 rows of data with out this time penalty??

If it would help I can figure out how to post the Explains.

Thanks

Explain for the longer query;

id      select_type   table       type    possible_keys               key        key_len  ref                                                   rows    Extra
1       PRIMARY       <derived2>  ALL     NULL                        NULL       NULL     NULL                                                  3744
2       DERIVED       s           const   PRIMARY                     PRIMARY    5                                                              1
2       DERIVED       srl         ref     series_id,series_id_2       series_id  5                                                              16      Using where
2       DERIVED       <derived3>  ALL     NULL                        NULL       NULL     NULL                                                  208     Using join buffer
2       DERIVED       en          eq_ref  PRIMARY,event_id,event_id_2 PRIMARY    9        race_reg_test.srl.event_id,bts.boat_id                1       Using index
2       DERIVED       er          ref     PRIMARY,boat_id,boat_id_2   boat_id_2  5        bts.boat_id                                           5
2       DERIVED       eri         eq_ref  PRIMARY                     PRIMARY    13       race_reg_test.srl.event_id,race_reg_test.srl.race_... 1
2       DERIVED       rr          ref     PRIMARY,boat_id             boat_id    4        bts.boat_id                                           9
2       DERIVED       rfi         eq_ref  PRIMARY                     PRIMARY    31       race_reg_test.srl.event_id,race_reg_test.srl.race_... 1
2       DERIVED       spo         ref     PRIMARY                     PRIMARY    8        race_reg_test.srl.id,race_reg_test.en.boat_id         1
3       DERIVED       srl1        ref     series_id,series_id_2       series_id  5                                                              16      Using index; Using temporary; Using filesort
3       DERIVED       en1         ref     PRIMARY,event_id,event_id_2 PRIMARY    5        race_reg_test.srl1.event_id                           11      Using where
3       DERIVED       er1         ref     boat_id,boat_id_2           boat_id    4        race_reg_test.en1.boat_id                             9       Using index
share|improve this question
    
Well new information. I think the execution times are just bogus for the select only. More looking and it looks like the FUNCTION call in the Select is the major time issue. Still don't know why phpmyAdmin gives such different execution time answers. hmmm... –  davewhirlwind Dec 31 '12 at 22:23
    
Any chances you could encapsulate some of this dataset with a View? –  Darth Continent Jan 3 '13 at 18:47
    
I would try running the base query with the no cache flag turned on: SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE srl.event_id ... Just to make sure it really is returning in 50ms and that it is not just coming back from cache. –  Seth Jan 12 '13 at 6:40
    
it's somehow obvious. he implicitly creates a temp table with 3744 entries. this temp table is then joined up with 16*208*5*9*16*11*9 = 237219840 fresh rows, resulting in an object with 888151080960 rows. when mysql has done that, it uses all the things defined in the WHERE statement and all the things, that should be in the wehre statement (i.e. complete='Y'). this large object of course has no keys, since temp tables don't. this might take some time. This query should be rewritten to use proper joins instead of subqueries. –  scones Jan 25 '13 at 3:54

2 Answers 2

You said you tried creating a temporary table, I am not sure if by that you mean a View or not.

I would create a View with that query and then perform any queries necessary on the View.

CREATE VIEW massive_query_view AS 
SELECT 
  srl.event_id as eid
 , srl.race_num as rnum
 , bts.boat_id as bid_id
 , srl.series_year as yr
 , srl.id as id 
 , IFNULL(rfi.fleet,fleet_def) as flt_old,flt_match,s.series_id as sid
 , s.series_year as syr
  ,IFNULL(ovr_pts,POINTS('4',IFNULL(ovr_place,place),num_start)) as points

 FROM

 (SELECT en1.boat_id,en1.boat_name,MAX(fleet) as fleet_def FROM entries en1 
 JOIN series_race_list srl1 ON srl1.event_id=en1.event_id 
              AND srl1.series_year=en1.race_year 
 LEFT JOIN entries_race er1 ON en1.boat_id= er1.boat_id 
                           AND srl1.event_id=en1.event_id      
                           AND srl1.series_year =en1.race_year 
 WHERE srl1.series_id ='3' AND srl1.series_year ='2012' 
                            AND en1.entry_deleted='N'      
 GROUP BY boat_id) bts 

 JOIN series_race_list srl LEFT JOIN series as s ON s.series_id=srl.series_id 
 AND s.series_year =srl.series_year 

 LEFT JOIN entries as en ON srl.event_id=en.event_id 
  AND srl.series_year =en.race_year AND bts.boat_id =en.boat_id 

 LEFT JOIN entries_race er ON er.race_id= srl.event_id AND er.race_num=srl.race_num 
                        AND er.yr = srl.series_year AND bts.boat_id =er.boat_id

 LEFT JOIN event_race_info as eri ON eri.race_id= srl.event_id 
     AND eri.race_num=srl.race_num AND eri.yr = srl.series_year 
     ANd er.line=eri.line     AND status REGEXP 'prelim|final' 

 LEFT JOIN race_results as rr ON srl.event_id=rr.race_id 
     AND srl.race_num= rr.race_num   AND srl.series_year =rr.yr 
     AND bts.boat_id= rr.boat_id AND checked_in='Y' 

LEFT JOIN race_fleet_info as rfi ON rfi.race_id= srl.event_id 
     AND rfi.yr=srl.series_year AND srl.race_num= rfi.race_num 
     AND rfi.fleet=rr.flt AND complete='Y'

LEFT JOIN series_pts_override as spo ON srl.id =spo.id AND en.boat_id =spo.bid

WHERE s.series_id ='3' AND s.series_year ='2012' AND approved ='Y'

Then, you can perform queries on the View.

SELECT * FROM massive_query_view;

Hope that speeds things up. Another thing you can do is check your indexes. Indexes make where clauses faster but inserts slower. For more information, view the MySQL documentation on how MySQL uses indexes: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mysql-indexes.html.

share|improve this answer

A few things, but the biggest one I see is in your original query... at the point of

boat_id) bts JOIN series_race_list srl LEFT JOIN series as s

You have no "ON" condition between bts and srl which will result in a Cartesian result and probably a big killer to you. For every record in bts, its creating an entry in srl, then from that product joining to series. From srl to series is ok as it is joined on apparent valid criteria / keys.

Next, you have a few fields that are not alias.field, such as max(fleet) in inner-most query that aliases out to "bts". In addition, why the MAX(fleet) if its grouped by the boat ID which I would interpret as a primary key and would be unique... would a boat ever change it's fleet? If so, is this accurate? If you have a table of fleets (also having its own auto-sequence ID), and a boat changes ownership/sponsor ship (whatever) to a pre-existing fleet from say... fleet 93 to a new who already had an ID on file of 47 where even though 47 was the newest relationship, but and older pre-existing ID... is that what you really want? MAX()?

Additional fields for no alias.field: ovr_pts and ovr_place, place in the field list (and what is the POINTS() function... status at the regular expression, checked_in at race results, and complete at race fleet info, and finally approved in the final where clause. Minor, but could be helpful for index optimizing.

Lastly, your query has the WHERE clause on specific "s.series_id... and s.series_year..." yet you have a LEFT-JOIN earlier in the query. This basically cancels out the left-join component of it and turns it into an implied INNER JOIN since you are not allowing for NULL as a valid option of inclusion.

After some clarification, I might even suggest altering the query around some, but the biggest thing I see was from the start... no "ON" condition joining bts and the series_rate_list table.

share|improve this answer

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