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I need to run hundreds thousands of functions at a predefined time, in an efficient way,

The code i currently have is like this:

class myclass
{
    public DateTime NextTime = DateTime.Now;
    Random rand = new Random();

    public void DoStuff()
    {
        if (NeedToWork())
        {
            // do some complex stuff on a 2nd thread.
            NextTime = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(rand.Next(60, 3600));
        }
    }

    public bool NeedToWork()
    {
        return DateTime.Now > NextTime;
    }

}

the calling function that is run from a timer:

    static List<myclass> mylist = new List<myclass>();
    static void Activator()
    {
        foreach (var item in mylist)
        {
            item.DoStuff();
        }

    }

My problem is when there is allot of items in the collection, going through all of them takes a very long time, resulting in some DoStuff() functions running late by over a minute in some cases.

Currently the "Activator" function is called from different threads concurrently to make the delay time as low as possible, (necessary thread synchronization is taken care of by using a Mutex)

The 2 solutions I thought of:

  1. instead of having one List<myclass>, I could have a dictionary like Dictionary<DateTime, List<myclass>>, with 1 second precision, and the each second, run the appropriate class objects, the dictionay would be mapping 'nexttime' to 'myclass' instances.
  2. create two List<>s or Queue<>s instead of the one list, they would be named 'fastqueue', and 'slowqueue' , slowqueue would have all the objects, fastqueue would have all the items that are soon to need work, and then have a dedicated thread looping through slow queue, and check the remaining time and put it in fastqueue.

Notes:

  1. The real code doesn't have any random data determining the next run time, it is actually based on some calculation, this is only a sample.

  2. Each one item doesn't need more than a fraction of a second to run, and each one run only a maximum of 4 times in a single hour. ram and cpu power is not an issue, I have tested and made allot of optimizations in different areas to make it fit, although not all of code is displayed here.

  3. The only thing that is wasting cpu time is the line that says return DateTime.Now > NextTime
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How long does each job take, and how many cores does the CPU have? It might be entirely impossible to run all the jobs in the allocated time on the current hardware. That isn't to say there can't be optimization, but you should make sure that it's even feasible. –  Bobson Dec 31 '12 at 19:00
    
@Bobson , that is not an issue, each one item doesn't need more than a fraction of a second to run, and each one run only a maximum of 4 times in a single hour. –  sharp12345 Dec 31 '12 at 19:02
    
All of those approaches ignore the simple fact of the limitation of available processing power. Even if the threads are called concurrfently, there is an inherent limitation based on number of available processors and the speed of each processor, as well as available RAM. I know that may not be helpful, but just saying, additional hardware may be a necerssary part of your solution. –  David Stratton Dec 31 '12 at 19:02
1  
bust out a profiler. See what percent of your time is spent doing meaningful work vs the overhead of scheduling tasks. If 99.9% of the CPU time is doing the meaningful work, and the CPU is at capacity, then you either need to get better hardware, do less stuff, or make the actual meaningful work more efficient. If the overhead is a significant percentage, then re-working it may actually mean something. Make sure you have a problem you can solve before trying to solve it. –  Servy Dec 31 '12 at 19:05
1  
@sharp12345 And when you profile the application as it's running what percentage of the runtime is spent running that line of code? A profiler will answer that question. It could be spending 5ms running that line out of several seconds of runtime, or it could be spending 25% of it's time there. It will depend largely on the specific data, how long your tasks take to run, and the hardware you're running it on. Rather than theorizing (a futile task for something this complex), a profiler will tell you for sure. –  Servy Dec 31 '12 at 19:10
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You might want to maintain a sorted queue or tree of work, sorted by the time to run.

Then your regular interval timer loop runs the first N items from the queue, stopping when an item is beyond the current interval time, as there is no need to look further.

When generating new work to add to the queue, using a sorted data structure, insertion should place it properly to keep it sorted.

(You'll also need to worry about thread safety in adding and removing from the queue.)

(FYI, There are lots of variations on scheduling algorithms.)


As another note, though not sure if it is useful for you, but when using these kind of time-based formulas, you might consider taking a snapshot of DateTime.Now to use several times, otherwise you can "loose" time if this thread is interrupted between calls to DateTime.Now

public void DoStuff(DateTime now)
{
    if (NeedToWork(now))
    {
        // do some complex stuff on a 2nd thread.
        NextTime = now.AddSeconds(rand.Next(60, 3600));
    }
}
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1  
If the list is sorted, there is no need for any regular interval timer - a thread that manages the list can just wait for the timeout interval of the item at the head of the list. –  Martin James Jan 9 '13 at 9:16
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I can't guarantee it to solve your problem since I don't know how much calculation power you have, but have you tried Parallel.ForEach instead of calling Activator from different threads? You can do it this way.

Parallel.ForEach(mylist, item =>
{
    item.DoStuff();
});

You may also want to set the MaxDegreeOfParallelism when calling Parallel.ForEach in case you want to limit the number of concurrent threads operating. If my answer is not clear or detailed enough please leave a comment.

EDIT: as the comments rightfully state, DoStuff() in my example will execute synchronously. Using Task.Factory.StartNew() or any equivalent to take advantage of the tasks scheduler could help. However, the author stated that most tasks are really small and execute in a very short time. For that reason, I think that the actual scheduling would cause unwanted overhead rather than serial execution on different threads.

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Considering he's spawning lots of background threads/tasks while he's looping, chances are the other threads are being kept busy during the loop, so parallelizing the loop won't increase throughput. (You would need to profile it to verify that statement though.) Basically you're paralleizing the part that spawns the child threads, and that's often (as a general rule) not beneficial. –  Servy Dec 31 '12 at 19:07
    
Using tasks can be more efficient than threads. He might be able to do this instead of the threading he's doing. –  Pete Dec 31 '12 at 19:08
    
I agree with both comments, perhaps mixing parallel computing with an appropriate maximum degree with tasks could achieve better results. –  Eve Dec 31 '12 at 19:16
    
@Pete He hasn't shown us what he's currently do to do the actual work in another thread. We can't comment on whether it could be done better, or how, without knowing what he's currently doing. –  Servy Dec 31 '12 at 19:20
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A delta-queue - a list sorted by timeout-time, is a common way of handling large numbers of long timeouts. I use one thread to manage the list. It waits on an input BlockingCollection queue with a timeout set to the interval between now and the timeout-time of the item at the head of the list. If the wait times out, it pops and fires the item at the head of the queue, gets the new head object, recalculates its wait time and waits on the input queue again, (if list empty, timeout set to INFINITE). New timeout items are pushed to the input queue and the thread inserts them before resuming its timeout activity.

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It would depend on the complexity of the tasks you are trying to execute and the amount of hardware resources you have, but I would suggest using a library for this kind of job: Quartz.net could be useful.

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