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In an array like int a[5] we can store 5 values from a[0] to a[4]. not this..?

I have a char mobile[10] variable in my class and I was storing exactly 10 character long string in this variable. But when I am reading it from file, a few characters from the next variable (declared just after this variable in class) are being appended in variable mobile. It took hours to investigate what is wrong.

I tried everything I could by changing the order of variable etc.

At last I'd set the size of mobile to 11 (char mobile[11]) and then store it into the binary file. Then everything goes well.

Here I have created a demo program that can demonstrate my study:

#include <iostream.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fstream.h>
#include <stdio.h>

class Test
{
    public:
    char mobile[10], address[30];
};

void main()
{
    clrscr();
    Test t;
    // uncoment below to write to file
    /*strcpy(t.mobile, "1234567890");
    strcpy(t.address, "Mumbai");

    fstream f("_test.bin", ios::binary | ios::out | ios::app);
    f.write((char*)&t, sizeof(t));*/

    // uncomment below to read from file
    /*fstream f("_test.bin", ios::binary | ios::in);
    f.read((char*)&t, sizeof(t));
    cout << t.mobile << "\t" << t.address;*/

    f.close();

    getch();
}

Is my assumption correct that I can not store n characters in an array like char[n] when working with files more specifically with binary files..?

Should I always take 1 extra size of required size..??

My compiler is Turbo C++ (may be 3.0). It is very old and discontinued product.

share|improve this question
    
There are perfectly good, up-to-date and free C++ compilers available. Do yourself a favor and pick one up (see MinGW for instance). –  Mat Dec 31 '12 at 20:27
    
I mostly use VC++. But I need to make it work in TC for now for some reasons @mat –  shashwat Dec 31 '12 at 20:29
    
You can either zero-terminate your strings or not, but you must be consistent and you must not pass strings that aren't zero-terminated to functions that expect zero-terminated strings. –  David Schwartz Dec 31 '12 at 21:08
    
Did u mean '\0' by the term zero-terminated..? @DavidSchwartz –  shashwat Dec 31 '12 at 21:10
    
Yes, terminated with a zero byte. One common alternative is passing the length along with the pointer. –  David Schwartz Dec 31 '12 at 21:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

character pointers in C/C++ must be null terminated. That means you must allot another character with value of '\0' at the end.

Also note, strcpy function copies all the characters from one string to another, until \0 is encountered, unless its a const string(an example is "hello world") which is stored as "hello world\0" during compilation.

Try this code:

#include <iostream.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fstream.h>
#include <stdio.h>

class Test
{
    public:
    char mobile[11], address[30];
};

void main()
{
    clrscr();
    Test t;
    // uncoment below to write to file
    strcpy(t.mobile, "1234567890");
    strcpy(t.address, "Mumbai");
    t.address[10] = '\0';
    fstream f("_test.bin", ios::binary | ios::out | ios::app);
    f.write((char*)&t, sizeof(t))

    // uncomment below to read from file
    fstream f("_test.bin", ios::binary | ios::in);
    f.read((char*)&t, sizeof(t));
    cout << t.mobile << "\t" << t.address;

    f.close();

    getch();
}
share|improve this answer
    
So I always need an extra size for char array. right..?? –  shashwat Dec 31 '12 at 20:31
    
yes you will always need one. –  Aniket Dec 31 '12 at 20:32
    
Yes, you MUST store the terminating character, otherwise your other code will use whatever rubbish is behind the string. –  Mats Petersson Dec 31 '12 at 20:32
    
I had already assumed that @Aniket, had specified in my code. I was just need of some theories. Thank you so much to describe –  shashwat Dec 31 '12 at 20:34

C-style strings (char arrays) are null terminated. You do not need to store the null terminator in your file, but you need it when printing the string.

In your example you use strcpy to copy a 10-character string into a char[10]. This is undefined behavior because strcpy appends a null terminator to the destination string. You need to use a char[11].

In your example you read 10 characters from the file and print them using cout. cout determines the length of the string by the null terminator. Since you don't have one, cout reads past the end of your string. This is also undefined behavior, but happens to work in most cases by reading characters from the next field in the struct. You need a null terminator on this array, which means you would need to increase your array size to 11 for this as well.

share|improve this answer
1  
std::string is not, but char arrays used as strings are, indeed. –  Mats Petersson Dec 31 '12 at 20:32
    
Thank you, clarified terminology. –  Dark Falcon Dec 31 '12 at 20:34
    
these namespaces do not works in TC @MatsPetersson –  shashwat Dec 31 '12 at 20:38
    
All the more reason not to use ancient compilers. I mean a compiler that could legally pass its driving test isn't exactly modern. It doesn't even generate 32-bit code, does it? –  Mats Petersson Dec 31 '12 at 20:41
    
yeah.. agree. It does not even run on 64-bit machines. Coz x64 machines does not support 16 bit apps. I have to use DOS-Box to make it work in my Win8x64 system. But need it now for some reasons. I myself not a fan of C/C++. Code in C# mostly. @MatsPetersson –  shashwat Dec 31 '12 at 20:46

The string literal "1234567890" occupies 11 bytes, not 10!

printf("%d", sizeof("1234567890"));
// 11

This is because the compiler silently adds a \0 character - end of string marker - at the end of string literals. This marker is used by various string manipulation functions, including strcpy.

Now, the following line:

strcpy(t.mobile, "1234567890");

attempts to copy the string - the 10 characters plus the \0 - into t.mobile. Since t.mobile is 10 bytes long, the \0 will overflow into the space used by other variables' space (or worse).

In your example:

  • strcpy(t.mobile, "1234567890") copies the string as expected but the \0 overflows into the space used by t.address
  • strcpy(t.address, "Mumbai") copies the string as expected, the \0 gets overwritten
  • The result of printing t.mobile should be "1234567890Mumbai"

Moral of the story: always account for the \0 byte when using C string functions. Failing to do so will cause unexpected problems including variable corruption, run time errors, or worse (e.g. data execution).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 very well explanation. Thanks –  shashwat Jan 1 '13 at 12:29

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