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I am having an interesting problem with a standard data driven Winform application.

The application was originally developed on Windows 7 and Visual Studio 2010. I then built a new development machine with Windows 8, and also Visual Studio 2010. I released a new version of the Winform application, built on the Windows 8 machine. No sourcecode changes, same .NET 4.0 framework target. Client PCs running the Winform app on Windows 7 now experience form rendering issues. Controls seems to be crunched a bit on Windows 7, visually changing the form, and in some cases, rendering functionality broken (controls off screen due to rendering issues).

I have since upgraded to VS2012, and targeting .NET 4.5. Same issue(s) still exist.

Is there something I need to do so I get consistent forms rendering between Windows 7 and Windows 8?

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2  
Change the video adapter's dots-per-inch setting to reproduce that on either machine. Control Panel + Display, "Change the size of all items" on Win8. You'll need to ensure your form auto-scales properly. –  Hans Passant Dec 31 '12 at 22:07
    
I've also noticed this problem, mostly on laptops with Win7, that they have the Windows Text size defaulted to 125%. Switching it to 100% seemed to solve the problem for me. –  Louis Ingenthron Apr 17 '13 at 16:03

1 Answer 1

I had similar issue. To fix it I check current DPI setting and scale dimensions horizontally and vertically where is needed. This helper class gives horizontal and vertical scale: HDpiScale, VDpiScale.

Usage:

MyControl.Height = (int) (MyControl.Height * util.VDpiScale);
MyControl.Width = (int) (MyControl.Width * util.HDpiScale);

It makes difference only if font size is x1.25

public class PresentationUtils : IPresentationUtils
{
    private double vDpiScale = -1;
    private double hDpiScale = -1;

    public double HDpiScale
    {
        get
        {
            if (hDpiScale < 0)
                SetDpiScales();
            return hDpiScale;
        }
    }

    public double VDpiScale
    {
        get
        {
            if (vDpiScale < 0)
                SetDpiScales();
            return vDpiScale;
        }
    }

    private void SetDpiScales()
    {
        vDpiScale = 1;
        hDpiScale = 1;

        IntPtr dc = GetDC(IntPtr.Zero);
        try
        {
            int hPixels = GetDeviceCaps(dc, (int) DeviceCap.LOGPIXELSX);
            int vPixels = GetDeviceCaps(dc, (int) DeviceCap.LOGPIXELSY);
            vDpiScale = vPixels/96.0;
            hDpiScale = hPixels/96.0;
        }
        finally
        {
            ReleaseDC(IntPtr.Zero, dc);
        }
    }

    [DllImport("gdi32.dll")]
    public static extern int GetDeviceCaps(IntPtr hdc, int nIndex);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    public static extern IntPtr GetDC(IntPtr hWnd);

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    public static extern bool ReleaseDC(IntPtr hWnd, IntPtr hDC);
}

public enum DeviceCap
{
    /// <summary>
    ///     Logical pixels inch in X
    /// </summary>
    LOGPIXELSX = 88,

    /// <summary>
    ///     Logical pixels inch in Y
    /// </summary>
    LOGPIXELSY = 90,
}
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