Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given a JS literal object like:

var foo = {
    _stuff : {
        a:10,
        b:20,
        c:30,
        state
    }
}

and literal functions

addAB: function() {
    add(foo._stuff[a], foo._stuff[b]);
}

addAC: function() {
    add(foo._stuff[a], foo._stuff[c]);
}

add: function(bar, baz) {
    foo._stuff[bar] += foo._stuff[baz];
    state(foo._stuff[bar]);
}

state: function(value) {
   foo.state[value] = .... something complex ....
}

How can I get the following in one pass ?

add(AB); foo._stuff[a] should be 30, foo.state[foo._stuff[a]] is something new
add(AC); foo._stuff[a] should be 40, foo.state[foo._stuff[a]] is something new

As is add() will try to lookup foo._stuff[10] which clearly wont do what I want.

Yes I know there is redundancy with addAB() and addAC() but that is out of my control.

share|improve this question
4  
"Given a JS literal object like:" --- it's syntactically incorrect –  zerkms Dec 31 '12 at 21:46
    
For what you're talking about, the addAB and addAC functions should be calling add with 'a', 'b' and 'a', 'c', respectivly, not foo._stuff['a'], etc. –  Paul S. Dec 31 '12 at 21:50
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pass the index instead of the value, like this:

addAB: function() {
    add('a', 'b');
}

addAC: function() {
    add('a', 'c');
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
add: function(bar, baz) {
    if (arguments.length === 1) {
        this['add' + arguments[0]];
    } else {
      foo._stuff[bar] += foo._stuff[baz];
      state(foo._stuff[bar]);
    }
}

// assuming you are calling
var AB = 'AB', AC = 'AC';
add(AB); 
add(AC);

Otherwise, I have not a clue what you are asking.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm not sure if I totally follow what you want to accomplish, but your object literal is not valid syntax. I don't see why you want the _stuff property. And, you need to initialize the state property to some value, even if it's undefined. But, since you want to store values in the state property based on some property name, you should initialize state to be an object.

var foo = {
    a:10,
    b:20,
    c:30,
    state: {}
}

Your javascript:

addAB: function() {
    add('a', 'b');
}

addAC: function() {
    add('a', 'c');
}

add: function(propName0, propName1) {
    foo[propName0] += foo[propName1];
    state(propName0);
}

state: function(propName) {
    // state is initialized to an object, so can store properties in there now
   foo.state[propName] = .... something complex ....
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.