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CakePHP's Model::afterFind() callback looks like:

afterFind(array $results, boolean $primary = false)

According to the documentation:

The $primary parameter indicates whether or not the current model was the model that the query originated on or whether or not this model was queried as an association. If a model is queried as an association the format of $results can differ.

They can differ, but experimentation shows that they don't always differ. As far as I can tell, the $primary parameter isn't actually all that useful. If it's set to false you may or may not get a flattened data structure, so you may or may not wind up with the dreaded "cannot use string offset as an array" error message.

Although I haven't tried it yet, my thought based on the documentation was to ignore the $primary flag altogether and just check the data:

public function afterFind($results, $primary = false) {
  if (array_key_exists(0, $results) {
    // operate on $results[0]['User']['fieldname']
  } else {
    // operate on $results['fieldname']
  }
  return $results;
}

This is hackish and I don't like it, but it seems likely to be more useful than $primary.

Explicitly stated, my questions are:

  1. What is the $primary flag actually useful for?
  2. Am I correct that it is not useful for determining the structure of the $results array, or have I missed something there?
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Indeed the $primary parameter seems to only be useful in warning you of cases where the format of $results is unpredictable. It is not useful in determining the format of $results.

More information here: https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/cake-php/Mqufi67UoFo

The solution offered there is to check !isset($results[$this->primaryKey]) to see what format $results is. This is also a bit of a hack, but arguably better than checking for a key '0'.

The solution I ultimately came up with is to do something like this:

public function afterFind($results, $useless) {

    // check for the primaryKey field
    if(!isset($results[$this->primaryKey])) {
        // standard format, use the array directly
        $resultsArray =& $results;
    } else {
        // stupid format, create a dummy array
        $resultsArray = array(array());
        // and push a reference to the single value into our array
        $resultsArray[0][$this->alias] =& $results;
    }

    // iterate through $resultsArray
    foreach($resultsArray as &$result) {
        // operate on $result[$this->alias]['fieldname']
        // one piece of code for both cases. yay!
    }

    // return $results in whichever format it came in
    // as but with the values modified by reference
    return parent::afterFind($results, $useless);
}

This reduces code duplication because you don't have to write your field alteration logic twice (once for an array and once for non-array).

You may be able to avoid the references stuff altogether by just returning $resultsArray at the end of the method, but I wasn't sure what issues that might cause if CakePHP (or some other parent class) expects $results in the way it was passed in. Plus this way doesn't have the overhead of copying the $results array.

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Ran into this problem today. Sometimes the $results set is a multi-dimensional array, sometime it's not. I feel like this should be a pretty big issue. –  vinhboy Aug 14 '13 at 16:56

I ran into this issue. The accepted answer works good. However, I had to make a minor adjustment. If you're looking to modify a field for example construct a fully qualified file name from logo, it's better to create a new field, as "return parent::afterFind($results, $useless);" will do it twice if the model find is called from some other model.

foreach($resultsArray as &$result) {
        // operate on $result[$this->alias]['fieldname']
        // one piece of code for both cases. yay!

        // Added logoFull instead of modifying logo
        if(isset($result[$this->alias]['logo'])){
            $result[$this->alias]['logoFull'] = Configure::read('urlImg') . 'logos' . DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR .
                'carrier' . DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR . $result[$this->alias]['logo'];
        }
    }
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If you can't always rely on primaryKey being in the fields list AND you know the key you are looking for, you can get away with something a bit more simple. Here is an example:

/**
 * Decrypt password
 *
 * @see Model::afterFind()
 */
public function afterFind($results, $primary = false) {        
    if (!empty($results['password'])) {
        $results['password'] = Security::rijndael($results['password'], Configure::read('encrypt.key'), 'decrypt');
        return $results;
    }

    foreach ($results as &$r) {
        if (!empty($r[$this->alias]['password'])) {
            $r[$this->alias]['password'] = Security::rijndael($r[$this->alias]['password'], Configure::read('encrypt.key'), 'decrypt');
        }
    }
    return $results;
}
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Answers in the book...

The $primary parameter indicates whether or not the current model was the model that the query originated on or whether or not this model was queried as an association. If a model is queried as an association the format of $results can differ;

Code expecting $primary to be true will probably get a "Cannot use string offset as an array" fatal error from PHP if a recursive find is used.

Thus it could be useful in certain situations for logic processing and may could be used to have a knock on effect into your $results

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4  
You may notice I quoted that same section of documentation. However, as I said in my question, if $primary is set to false that doesn't necessarily mean that $results will be formatted any differently. As the docs say, "the format of $results can differ." But then again, it might not. Experimentation supports this. –  eaj Jan 7 '13 at 15:23

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