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In an attempt to create a N-ary tree with multiple node with different type of node objects[Country | State etc], I tried modifying the below generic class from -

https://github.com/vivin/GenericTree/blob/master/src/main/java/net/vivin/GenericTreeNode.java

I tried the following -

package com.mycompany.ds;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class GenericTreeNode<T>{

    private T data;
    private List<GenericTreeNode<? super T>> children;
    private GenericTreeNode<? super T> parent;

    public GenericTreeNode() {
        super();
        children = new ArrayList<GenericTreeNode<? super T>>();
    }

    public GenericTreeNode(T data) {
        this();
        setData(data);
    }

    public GenericTreeNode<? super T> getParent() {
        return this.parent;
    }

    public List<GenericTreeNode<? super T>> getChildren() {
        return this.children;
    }

    public int getNumberOfChildren() {
        return getChildren().size();
    }

    public boolean hasChildren() {
        return (getNumberOfChildren() > 0);
    }

    public void setChildren(List<GenericTreeNode<? super T>> children) {
        for(GenericTreeNode<? super T> child : children) {
           child.parent = this;
        }

        this.children = children;
    }

    public void addChild(GenericTreeNode<? super T> child) {
        child.parent = this;
        children.add(child);
    }

    public void addChildAt(int index, GenericTreeNode<T> child) throws IndexOutOfBoundsException {
        child.parent = this;
        children.add(index, child);
    }

    public void removeChildren() {
        this.children = new ArrayList<GenericTreeNode<? super T>>();
    }

    public void removeChildAt(int index) throws IndexOutOfBoundsException {
        children.remove(index);
    }

    public GenericTreeNode<? super T> getChildAt(int index) throws IndexOutOfBoundsException {
        return children.get(index);
    }

    public T getData() {
        return this.data;
    }

    public void setData(T data) {
        this.data = data;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return getData().toString();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj) {
           return true;
        }
        if (obj == null) {
           return false;
        }
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass()) {
           return false;
        }
        GenericTreeNode<?> other = (GenericTreeNode<?>) obj;
        if (data == null) {
           if (other.data != null) {
              return false;
           }
        } else if (!data.equals(other.data)) {
           return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    /* (non-Javadoc)
    * @see java.lang.Object#hashCode()
    */
    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
       final int prime = 31;
       int result = 1;
       result = prime * result + ((data == null) ? 0 : data.hashCode());
       return result;
    }

    public String toStringVerbose() {
        String stringRepresentation = getData().toString() + ":[";

        for (GenericTreeNode<? super T> node : getChildren()) {
            stringRepresentation += node.getData().toString() + ", ";
        }

        //Pattern.DOTALL causes ^ and $ to match. Otherwise it won't. It's retarded.
        Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(", $", Pattern.DOTALL);
        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(stringRepresentation);

        stringRepresentation = matcher.replaceFirst("");
        stringRepresentation += "]";

        return stringRepresentation;
    }
}

But errors in the following methods -

 public void setChildren(List<GenericTreeNode<? super T>> children) {
        for(GenericTreeNode<? super T> child : children) {
           child.parent = this;
        }

        this.children = children;
    }

    public void addChild(GenericTreeNode<? super T> child) {
        child.parent = this;
        children.add(child);
    }

Errors -

1 - Type mismatch: cannot convert from GenericTreeNode<T> to GenericTreeNode<? super capture#2-of ? super 
 T>

2 - Type mismatch: cannot convert from GenericTreeNode<T> to GenericTreeNode<? super capture#4-of ? super 
 T>

How can I fix these?

share|improve this question
    
When you actually use GenericTreeNode<T>, what's your T going to be? –  matts Dec 31 '12 at 22:25
    
T is all nodes type [or sub-type of nodes] that I want to store in the tree –  JAGAMOT Dec 31 '12 at 22:32
    
So you want to modify the original GenericTreeNode so that any kind of Object can be added to the tree? Or just a few? If the former, just remove anything generics. –  Cyrille Ka Dec 31 '12 at 22:40
    
@ckarmann - I only want certain type of nodes to be added to the tree. I don't mind removing generics, but the problem is I don't want to deal with class casting as well! –  JAGAMOT Dec 31 '12 at 22:45

3 Answers 3

You could create a class / interface that represents a GISEntity and create the generic tree node whose generic type T extends GISEntity. This would allow you to have nodes of different kinds of GISEntity subclasses-- Country / State etc.

share|improve this answer
    
you mean something like - public class GenericTreeNode<T extends GISEntity>{ .. }? How about member variables? Sample code snippet? –  JAGAMOT Dec 31 '12 at 22:36

To build up on the answer of ditkin: after having made all your classes implement or extend GISEntity, you would write your tree this way:

public class GenericTreeNode<T extends GISEntity>{

    private T data;
    private List<GenericTreeNode<? extends GISEntity>> children;
    private GenericTreeNode<? extends GISEntity> parent;

    public GenericTreeNode() {
        super();
        children = new ArrayList<GenericTreeNode<? extends GISEntity>>();
    }

    ////////
    ......
    ////////

    public void addChild(GenericTreeNode<? extends GISEntity> child) {
        child.parent = this;
        children.add(child);
    }

    public void addChildAt(int index, GenericTreeNode<? extends GISEntity> child) throws IndexOutOfBoundsException {
        child.parent = this;
        children.add(index, child);
    }

    ////////
    ......
    ////////

}

Note that it will not really help you to avoid class casting. The thing is that as soon as you have added children to your node, when you retrieve them you just know that they are GISEntity, because of type erasure. So this technique only give you a bit of type safety.

share|improve this answer
    
@carkmann - might be basic, but when to user T and ?. I started modifying all my methods accordingly! –  JAGAMOT Dec 31 '12 at 23:30

It's not a good idea to use Generic in order to store different types of objects in the same collection. What you should do is to create an hierarchy and use it to store your objects. With a good design, the base class will have all that's necessary to access the different objects without casting; otherwise you will have to write some cast here and there. Here is an example of code (please note that the design here is far from beeing optimal and is simply to show the use of virtual function and polymorphism) :

static class GISEntity {
    final String name;
    public GISEntity (String name) { this.name = name; }
    public String getName() { return name; }
    public String getTypeName() { return "GISEntity"; }
    public String toString() { return name; }
}
//
static class Country extends GISEntity {
    final String typeName = "country";
    public Country (String name) { super(name); }
    public String getTypeName() { return typeName; }
    public String toString() { return name; }
}
//
static class State extends GISEntity {
    public State (String name) { super(name); }
    public String getTypeName() { return "state"; }
    public String toString() { return name; }
}
//
static class Territory extends GISEntity {
    public Territory (String name) { super(name); }
    public String getTypeName() { return "territory"; }
    public String toString() { return name; }
}
//
// Here's an example of subclassing GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>:
//
static class IsATerritory extends GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> {

    IsATerritory (String name) { super (new Territory (name)); }

    public GISEntity getData() {
        State s = new State (super.getData().getName().toUpperCase());
        return s; }
};
//
// Here we put some data. Note that the order of insertion is important
// for the tree and that it's not alphabetical in this example.
//
GenericTree<GISEntity> earth = new GenericTree<GISEntity>() ;
//
GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> ListOfCountries = new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new GISEntity("List of countries"));
//
GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> US = new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new Country("United States"));
GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> Washington = new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new State("Washington"));
GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> Florida = new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new State("Florida"));
//
GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> Canada = new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new Country("Canada"));
//
// We are now using some different ways for creating the nodes:
//
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
List<GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>> CanadaProvinces = new ArrayList<GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>>(
Arrays.asList(new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new State("Quebec")), 
    new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new State("Ontario")))
);
//
US.addChild(Washington);
US.addChild(Florida);
//
// Here's are two examples of subclassing; this time with anonymous classes.
// Don't forget that these two anonymous classes will hold an hidden reference
// to the outer classe as they are not static!
//
GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> alberta = new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>() {
    { setData(new State ("Alberta")); }

    public GISEntity getData() {
        State s = new State (super.getData().getName().toUpperCase());
        return s; 
      }
};
//
GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> saskatchewan = new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new State ("saskatchewan")) {
    public GISEntity getData() {
        State s = new State (super.getData().getName().toUpperCase());
        return s; }
};
//
CanadaProvinces.add(alberta);
CanadaProvinces.add(saskatchewan);
//
// Other ways for creating the nodes:
CanadaProvinces.add(new GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>(new State("Manitoba")));
//
// Note the use of the IsATerritory subclass:
CanadaProvinces.add(new IsATerritory("Northwest Territories"));
//
Canada.setChildren(CanadaProvinces);
//
ListOfCountries.addChild(Canada);
ListOfCountries.addChild(US);
//
earth.setRoot(ListOfCountries);
//
System.out.println(earth.toString());
System.out.println();
System.out.println(earth.toStringWithDepth());
System.out.println();
System.out.println(ListOfCountries.toStringVerbose());
//
List<GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>> loc = earth.build(GenericTreeTraversalOrderEnum.PRE_ORDER);
System.out.println(loc);
//
Map<GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>, Integer> locd = earth.buildWithDepth(GenericTreeTraversalOrderEnum.PRE_ORDER);
System.out.println(locd);
//
Map<GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>, Integer> locd2 = earth.buildWithDepth(GenericTreeTraversalOrderEnum.POST_ORDER);
System.out.println(locd2);
//
// Two examples of iteration; showing both the use of the instanceof operator
// and of virtual (or override) functions:
// 
for (GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> gen: loc) {
    GISEntity data = gen.getData();

    if (data instanceof State) {
        System.out.println("Is State: " + data.getName());
    } else if (data instanceof Country) {
        System.out.println("Is Country: " + data.getName());
    } else {
        System.out.println(data.getTypeName() + data.getName());
    }
}
//
for (Entry<GenericTreeNode<GISEntity>, Integer> entry: locd.entrySet()) {
    GISEntity data = entry.getKey().getData();
    Integer depth = entry.getValue();

    if (data instanceof State) {
        System.out.println(depth.toString() + ": Is State: " + data.getName());
    } else if (data instanceof Country) {
        System.out.println(depth.toString() + ": Is Country: " + data.getName());
    } else {
        System.out.println(depth.toString() + ": " + data.getTypeName() + data.getName());
    }
}

In this example, I have subclassed the class GenericTreeNode in three different ways (two anonymous classes, one a named class) in order to change the getData so that it will return a new GISEntity where the name has been replaced with its UpperCase copy.

Note that will all these three subclasses, I'm using GenericTreeNode<GISEntity> and not something like GenericTreeNode<Territory>. This is because that even if Territory is a subclass of GISEntry, the class GenericTreeNode<Territory> is not a subclass of GenericTreeNode<GISEntry>.

For using something like a mix of GenericTreeNode<Territory> with GenericTreeNode<GISEntry>, we have to use the ? extends GISEntry and ? super GISEntry and this will multiply by one thousand the complexity of the generic code. Unless that you want to make some heavy subclassing of the generic classes GenericTree<> and GenericTreeNode<>, it's totally useless to use the ? type; even for a collecting different types of objects. Unless that you have years of experience in generic code, don't use the ? notation. Most projects will do totally fine with the simpler generic code.

I've also added some examples of iterations over the generic tree for both the build() and the buildWithDepth() functions for those interested.

Finally, as a reference, this generic tree is explained in http://vivin.net/2010/01/30/generic-n-ary-tree-in-java/ (3 pages).

share|improve this answer
    
This structure seems to be working, but I have problem converting the tree to JSON object for UI representation. Jackson JSON Serialization is running into a recursive loop with parent-child-parent relationship. I got rid of that by using annotation from wiki.fasterxml.com/JacksonFeatureBiDirReferences site but now, I am looking at the JSON string after serializing and I am loosing my parent references! Any ideas? –  JAGAMOT Jan 7 '13 at 23:50
    
I never used JSON so I cannot really understand what's going on. However, the relationship that you are mentionning is about cyclic relationships but the tree mentionned is NOT cyclic. However, even if it's not cyclic, it's still possible that you might have added this cyclic relationship yourself in your objects; either voluntarily or by error. –  SylvainL Jan 7 '13 at 23:57
    
I guess the cyclic structure is when using n-ary tree. Every TreeNode has a parent and list of children. This itself is cyclic when you start storing the nodes into the tree, at least with complex objects. Try inserting the above nodes into a tree using the above mentioned sample implementation from vivin. You debug the tree after inserting parent and children nodes to the tree and try inspecting the tree object. You should notice the tree is cyclic with parent child relation ship –  JAGAMOT Jan 8 '13 at 3:11
    
I've just checked and I've made a big mistake: there is indeed a cyclic relationship in the above code because each child has itself a reference to its parent and if we take the list of child as a list of hoop, we also have multi-hoops cyclic relationships. For example, not only we have a P<->C1 bidirectional relationship but we also have a P->C1->C2->P cyclic relationship if the list List<GenericTreeNode<T>> is seen by JSON as a list of related children. The solution would be to temporarily set to null the parent reference for each node. Later, these can be reset if necessary. –  SylvainL Jan 8 '13 at 15:24
    
By cyclic relationship, I was thinking into the line of A<->B<->C<->A then just a single bidirectional relationship like A<->B (most serialization mecanism won't have any problem with that) or A<->(List of Children Cn)<->A. Also, with JSON, if we set the Parent reference to null before serialising it, we will have to reset it after the de-serialisation process. However, my own preference would probably to completely remove this Parent reference from the nodes instead; as it will not be necessary for most implementations. –  SylvainL Jan 8 '13 at 15:33

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