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Scala noob here.

Here is my simple for loop

  def forExampleStoreValues = {
    println(">>forExampleStoreValues");
    val retVal = for{i <- 1 to 5 if i % 2 == 0}  yield i;
    println("retVal=" + retVal);    
  }

My expectation is when I call this, the last val will be returned automatically. However when I call this from main,

object MainRunner {
  def main(args: Array[String]){
    println("Scala stuff!");  // println comes from Predef which definitions for anything inside a Scala compilation unit. 
    runForExamples();
  }

  def runForExamples() {
    val forLE = new ForLoopExample(); // No need to declare type.
    println("forExampleStoreValues=" +forLE.forExampleStoreValues)  
  }
}

The output is:

>>forExampleStoreValues
retVal=Vector(2, 4)
forExampleStoreValues=()

So then I try to explictly return the retval.

  def forExampleStoreValues = {
    println(">>forExampleStoreValues");
    val retVal = for{i <- 1 to 5 if i % 2 == 0}  yield i;
    println("retVal=" + retVal);    
    return retval;
  }

This gives:

method forExampleStoreValues has return statement; needs result type

So I change function signature to:

 def forExampleStoreValues():Vector 

which gives:

Vector takes type parameters

At this stage, not sure what to put in and I want to ensure I am not doing something I don't need to do.

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2 Answers 2

You don't need an explicit return. The last expression in your method will always be returned.

def forExampleStoreValues = {
  println(">>forExampleStoreValues")
  val retVal = for{i <- 1 to 5 if i % 2 == 0}  yield i
  println("retVal=" + retVal)  
  retVal
}

This also means that if you end your method with println(...), it will return () of type Unit, since that is the return type of println. If you do you an explicit return (usually because you want to return early), you need to specify the result type. The result type is Vector[Int], not Vector.

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that just returns forExampleStoreValues=(), as if the Vector is not returned. It should print it. –  dublintech Dec 31 '12 at 22:14
1  
I tested the code and it works. –  Kim Stebel Dec 31 '12 at 22:18
    
how do you invoke the function and how do you output what is returned? –  dublintech Dec 31 '12 at 22:28
1  
scala> :paste // Entering paste mode (ctrl-D to finish) def forExampleStoreValues = { println(">>forExampleStoreValues") val retVal = for{i <- 1 to 5 if i % 2 == 0} yield i println("retVal=" + retVal) retVal } // Exiting paste mode, now interpreting. forExampleStoreValues: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Int] scala> forExampleStoreValues >>forExampleStoreValues retVal=Vector(2, 4) res0: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Int] = Vector(2, 4) –  Kim Stebel Dec 31 '12 at 22:37
1  
No, you should add the complete code of that object to your question. –  Kim Stebel Dec 31 '12 at 22:49

The last value in a Scala function is returned. The explicit return is not necessary.

Your code can be simplified to this where the for expression returns a IndexSeq[Int] which is inferred by the compiler.

def forExampleStoreValues = {
  for{i <- 1 to 5 if i % 2 == 0}  yield i;    
}

scala>forExampleStoreValues
res0: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Int] = Vector(2, 4)

The expression for{i <- 1 to 5 if i % 2 == 0} yield i; returns an instance of Vector[Int] which implements the trait IndexedSeq. So, to manually specify the type you can add IndexedSeq[Int] to the for expression.

 def forExampleStoreValues: IndexedSeq[Int] = {
   for{i <- 1 to 5 if i % 2 == 0}  yield i;    
 }
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