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I started playing with someone's else code and came across an interesting experiment. The program will work fine with the if statement. But I found out if I change the if statement into a while loop, the program runs but I could not close the program with the X button instead I had to press Eclipse terminate button. I am guessing this is a sign of an infinite loop or is it the fact that Java cannot repeatedly draw the same images over and over again?

// if you want to draw graphics on the screen, use the paintComponent method
        // it give you a graphic context to draw on
        public void paintComponent(Graphics g){

            super.paintComponent(g);

            // when the player is still in the game
            if(inGame){
                g.drawImage(apple, apple_x, apple_y, this);

                for (int z = 0; z < dots; z++) {
                    if (z == 0)
                        g.drawImage(head, collisionX[z], collisionY[z], this);
                    else g.drawImage(tail, collisionX[z], collisionY[z], this);
                }
                Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().sync();

                // dispose graphics and redraw new one
                g.dispose();
            }
            else gameOver(g);
        }
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Probably some other method in that class sets inGame to false. The code inside the if/while never calls that method, so when you change the "if" to a "while, it loops forever. Find out what sets inGame and make sure that gets called inside the loop. – Uh Clem Dec 31 '12 at 23:14
    
@UhClem It's a bad idea to have paintComponent() run indefinitely, so more changes than that will be required – millimoose Dec 31 '12 at 23:14
2  
Don't call g.dispose, this is disposing of the main graphics context created by the repaint manager, which means that when it tries to paint anything else on the screen, it is no longer painting to a valid context. Only dispose of graphics context that you create! – MadProgrammer Jan 1 '13 at 2:19
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want your UI to remain responsive, event handlers and repaints should finish within a reasonable amount of time. This means you shouldn't loop inside paintComponent() at all; instead you have to repeatedly trigger a repaint from somewhere else, like an animation timer.

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great point, I never knew about that! Thanks for the knowledge! – Nicholas Dec 31 '12 at 23:46

Changing this line into a while statement

if (inGame) {

will not allow the variable to be reset to false, resulting in the infinite loop. Having while loops or any resource-heavy calls in paintComponent is a bad idea in general. Swing has concurrency mechanisms to deal with these.

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I will keep that in mind, if statement it is then =] It is also a bad idea to have a loop inside paintComponent method because paintComponent method gets called repeatedly? – Nicholas Dec 31 '12 at 23:20
1  
Yes, and having a delay will lead to poor performance in painting and generally. – Reimeus Dec 31 '12 at 23:23

Changing the if to a while, ie:

while(inGame){

will loop forever if inGame is true, because there would be only two ways to exit the loop:

  • inGame is set to false within the loop
  • the is a break statement in the loop

neither of which is found in the code.


fyi, the code pattern while(true) is a common way to create an infinite loop, which is needed for things like web services waiting for requests

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