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I've designed an algorithm to find the longest common subsequence. these are steps:

Starts with i = 0

  1. Picks the first letter from the first string start from ith letter.
  2. Go to the second string looking for that picked letter.
  3. If not found return to the first string and picks the next letter and repeat 1 to 3 until it finds a letter that is in the second string.
  4. Now that found a common letter in the second string, adds that to $common_subsequence.
  5. Store its position in $index.
  6. Picks next letter from the first string and do step 2 but this time starts from $index.
  7. Repeat 3 to 6 until reached end of string 1 or string 2.
  8. If length $common_subsequence is greater than length of common subsequence so far add that change lcs to the $common_subsequence.
  9. Add 1 to the i and repeat 1 to 9 while i is less that length of the first string.

This is an example:
‫‪

X=A, B, C, B, D, A, B‬‬  
‫‪Y=B, D, C, A, B, A‬‬ 
  1. First pick A.
  2. Look for A in Y.
  3. Now that found A add that to the $common_subsequence.
  4. Then pick B from X.
  5. Look for B in Y but this time start searching from A.
  6. Now pick C. It isn't there in string 2, so pick the next letter in X that is B.
    ...
    ...
    ...

The complexity of this algorithm is theta(n*m). Here is my implementations:

First algorithm:

import time
def lcs(xstr, ystr):
    if not (xstr and ystr): return # if string is empty
    lcs = [''] #  longest common subsequence
    lcslen = 0 # length of longest common subsequence so far
    for i in xrange(len(xstr)):
        cs = '' # common subsequence
        start = 0 # start position in ystr
        for item in xstr[i:]:
            index = ystr.find(item, start) # position at the common letter
            if index != -1: # if common letter has found
                cs += item # add common letter to the cs
                start = index + 1
            if index == len(ystr) - 1: break # if reached end of the ystr
        # update lcs and lcslen if found better cs
        if len(cs) > lcslen: lcs, lcslen = [cs], len(cs) 
        elif len(cs) == lcslen: lcs.append(cs)
    return lcs

file1 = open('/home/saji/file1')
file2 = open('/home/saji/file2')
xstr = file1.read()
ystr = file2.read()

start = time.time()
lcss = lcs(xstr, ystr)
elapsed = (time.time() - start)
print elapsed

The same algorithm using hash table:

import time
from collections import defaultdict
def lcs(xstr, ystr):
    if not (xstr and ystr): return # if strings are empty
    lcs = [''] #  longest common subsequence
    lcslen = 0 # length of longest common subsequence so far
    location = defaultdict(list) # keeps track of items in the ystr
    i = 0
    for k in ystr:
        location[k].append(i)
        i += 1
    for i in xrange(len(xstr)):
        cs = '' # common subsequence
        index = -1
        reached_index = defaultdict(int)
        for item in xstr[i:]:
            for new_index in location[item][reached_index[item]:]:
                reached_index[item] += 1
                if index < new_index:
                    cs += item # add item to the cs
                    index = new_index
                    break
            if index == len(ystr) - 1: break # if reached end of the ystr
        # update lcs and lcslen if found better cs
        if len(cs) > lcslen: lcs, lcslen = [cs], len(cs) 
        elif len(cs) == lcslen: lcs.append(cs)
    return lcs

file1 = open('/home/saji/file1')
file2 = open('/home/saji/file2')
xstr = file1.read()
ystr = file2.read()

start = time.time()
lcss = lcs(xstr, ystr)
elapsed = (time.time() - start)
print elapsed
share|improve this question
4  
Looping by index is almost always a terrible idea in Python - there are generally much better ways. Also, empty strings evaluate to None, so don't check if len(str) is 0, just check that not str. –  Lattyware Dec 31 '12 at 23:18
2  
I'd recommend dynamic programming here. Lookup wikipedia –  inspectorG4dget Dec 31 '12 at 23:19
4  
Dynamic Programming has a lower lower-bound than yours and performs fewer comparisons than yours does (even though it has the same big-O comparisons). As a result, the actual runtime will be faster, even though it's in the same complexity class –  inspectorG4dget Dec 31 '12 at 23:26
3  
@Rastegar: Your professor wanted you to invent a new algorithm? Or just to implement some good algorithm? If you're interested in the research question, rather than just what you need for your program, see A survey of longest common subsequence algorithms by Bergroth, Hakonen, and Raita, which will get you the background you need. –  abarnert Dec 31 '12 at 23:36
2  
@Rastegar: Well, you can always go to the library and get the journal in dead-tree form and copy from that instead. :) –  abarnert Jan 1 '13 at 0:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If your professor wants you to invent your own LCS algorithm, you're done. Your algorithm is not the most optimal one ever created, but it's in the right complexity class, you clearly understand it, and you clearly didn't copy your implementation from the internet. You might want to be prepared to defend your algorithm, or discuss alternatives. If I were your prof, I'd give you an A if:

  • You turned in that program.
  • You were able to explain why there's no possible O(N) or O(N log M) alternative.
  • You were able to participate in a reasonable discussion about other algorithms that might have a better lower bound (or significantly lower constants, etc.), and the time/space tradeoffs, etc., even if you didn't know the outcome of that discussion in advance.

On the other hand, if your professor wants you to pick one of the well-known algorithms and write your own implementation, you probably want to use the standard LP algorithm. It's a standard algorithm for a reason—which you probably want to read up on until you understand. (Even if it isn't going to be on the test, you're taking this class to learn, not just to impress the prof, right?)

Wikipedia has pseudocode for a basic implementation, then English-language descriptions of common optimizations. I'm pretty sure that writing your own Python code based on what's on that page wouldn't count as plagiarism, or even as a trivial port, especially if you can demonstrate that you understand what your code is doing, and why, and why it's a good algorithm. Plus, you're writing it in Python, which has much better ways to memoize than what's demonstrated in that article, so if you understand how it works, your code should actually be substantially better than what Wikipedia gives you.

Either way, as I suggested in the comments, I'd read A survey of longest common subsequence algorithms by Bergroth, Hakonen, and Raita, and search for similar papers online.

share|improve this answer
maxLength = 0
foundString = ""
for start in xrange(len(str1)-1):
     for end in xrange(start+1, len(str1)):
        str1Temp = str1[start:end]   
        maxLengthTemp = len(str1Temp)
        if(str2.find(str1Temp)):
             if(maxLengthTemp>maxLength):
                 maxLength = maxLengthTemp
                 foundString = str1Temp

print maxLength
print foundString
share|improve this answer
3  
The OP asks whether his algorithm is good. You respond by posting a completely different algorithm, with no discussion on why it's better, what's different about it, etc. What's the point of that? Especially since, from a quick glance, it looks like your algorithm is at best O(N^2*M) instead of his O(N^2) or DP's O(N*M) –  abarnert Dec 31 '12 at 23:50

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