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explain
select
    *
from
    zipcode_distances z 
inner join
    venues v    
    on z.zipcode_to=v.zipcode
inner join
    events e
    on v.id=e.venue_id
where
    z.zipcode_from='92108' and
    z.distance <= 5

I'm trying to find all "events at venues within 5 miles of zipcode 92108", however, I am having a hard time optimizing this query.

Here is what the explain looks like:

id, select_type, table, type, possible_keys, key, key_len, ref, rows, Extra

1, SIMPLE, e, ALL, idx_venue_id, , , , 60024, 
1, SIMPLE, v, eq_ref, PRIMARY,idx_zipcode, PRIMARY, 4, comedyworld.e.venue_id, 1, 
1, SIMPLE, z, ref, idx_zip_from_distance,idx_zip_to_distance,idx_zip_from_to, idx_zip_from_to, 30, const,comedyworld.v.zipcode, 1, Using where; Using index

I'm getting a full table scan on the "e" table, and I can't figure out what index I need to create to get it to be fast.

Any advice would be appreciated

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Do you need all columns from all tables in result set? –  Hamlet Hakobyan Dec 31 '12 at 23:28
    
I am trying to avoid using an "in" subquery. –  john Dec 31 '12 at 23:32
    
The colloaquial description of what I'm trying to do is to find the venues whose zipcodes reside in the zipcodes I found to be in proximity to 92108. So it joins in on the venue, and then joins in the events associated to that venue. –  john Dec 31 '12 at 23:33
    
is e.venue_id indexed? –  povilasp Dec 31 '12 at 23:35
    
yes e.venue_id is indexed –  john Dec 31 '12 at 23:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Based on the EXPLAIN output in your question, you already have all the indexes the query should be using, namely:

CREATE INDEX idx_zip_from_distance
  ON zipcode_distances (zipcode_from, distance, zipcode_to);
CREATE INDEX idx_zipcode ON venues (zipcode, id);
CREATE INDEX idx_venue_id ON events (venue_id);

(I'm not sure from your index names whether idx_zip_from_distance really includes the zipcode_to column. If not, you should add it to make it a covering index. Also, I've included the venues.id column in idx_zipcode for completeness, but, assuming it's the primary key for the table and that you're using InnoDB, it will be included automatically anyway.)

However, it looks like MySQL is choosing a different, and possibly suboptimal, query plan, where it scans through all events, finds their venues and zip codes, and only then filters the results on distance. This could be the optimal query plan, if the cardinality of the events table was low enough, but from the fact that you're asking this question I assume it's not.

One reason for the suboptimal query plan could be the fact that you have too many indexes which are confusing the planner. For instance, do you really need all three of those indexes on the zipcode table, given that the data it stores is presumably symmetric? Personally, I'd suggest only the index I described above, plus a unique index (which can also be the primary key, if you don't have an artificial one) on (zipcode_to, zipcode_from) (preferably in that order, so that any occasional queries on zipcode_to=? can make use of it).

However, based on some testing I did, I suspect the main issue why MySQL is choosing the wrong query plan comes simply down to the relative cardinalities of your tables. Presumably, your actual zipcode_distances table is huge, and MySQL isn't smart enough to realize quite how much the conditions in the WHERE clause really narrow it down.

If so, the best and simplest fix may be to simply force MySQL to use the indexes you want:

select
    *
from
    zipcode_distances z 
    FORCE INDEX (idx_zip_from_distance)
inner join
    venues v    
    FORCE INDEX (idx_zipcode)
    on z.zipcode_to=v.zipcode
inner join
    events e
    FORCE INDEX (idx_venue_id)
    on v.id=e.venue_id
where
    z.zipcode_from='92108' and
    z.distance <= 5

With that query, you should indeed get the desired query plan. (You do need FORCE INDEX here, since with just USE INDEX the query planner could still decide to use a table scan instead of the suggested index, defeating the purpose. I had this happen when I first tested this.)

Ps. Here's a demo on SQLize, both with and without FORCE INDEX, demonstrating the issue.

share|improve this answer

Have indexed the columns in both tables?

e.id and v.venue_id

If you do not, creates indexes in both tables. If you already have, it could be that you have few records in one or more tables and analyzer detects that it is more efficient to perform a full scan rather than an indexed read.

share|improve this answer

You could use a subquery:

select * from zipcode_distances z, venues v, events e
where
    z.id in (select id from zipcode z where z.zipcode_from='92108' and z.distance <= 5)
    and z.zipcode_to=v.zipcode
    and v.id=e.venue_id
share|improve this answer

You are selecting all columns from all tables (select *) so there is little point in the optimizer using an index when the query engine will then have to do a lookup from the index to the table on every single row.

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