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I am considering various ways of having an each() method wrap around iterating in a programming language. I came up with the following idea of "inline functions with yields". Its purpose is to avoid closures with nonlocal returns which I've also seen called block lambdas. Example pseudocode with explanation after it:

class LinkedList
    iterator()
        # construct and return iterator

    inline each()
        iter = iterator()
        while iter.hasNext()
            yield iter.next()

main()
    list = LinkedList.new
    # add stuff to linked list

    list.each()
        # somehow the yield in each() populates v
        print v
        if v == "foo"
            return

The inline keyword means the each() invocation is inlined when it is called, yield is replaced with the indented code block at the invocation site, and the "yielded" expression, iter.next() in the example, is passed to that indented code block as a variable as well. In effect the code for main() is transformed to the following

main()
    list = LinkedList.new
    # add stuff to linked list

    # list.each() call transformed
    iter = list.iterator()
    while iter.hasNext()
        v = iter.next()
        print v
        if v == "foo"
            return

The indented code block after list.each() isn't being passed as a closure to each() to be executed. If it were then the meaning of the return statement would be confusing. Would it mean return from the closure, return from each(), or return from main().

The return statement in main() returns from main() because each() is being inlined into the code of main(). This avoids the complications of closures with nonlocal returns.

The issue I am having is how to populate the variable v in the example pseudocode given at the top. I can't think of a good syntax that is reasonable. Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could just do it sort of like any other language's for each loop. Java's goes like for(fooType foo: fooList) proc;. IIRC, Python goes like for foo in fooList: proc. PostScript goes fooList proc forall. Each of those constructs iterates through fooList, executing proc for each foo in fooList. Except for the PostScript one, they all fetch fooList.iterator() or fooList.__iter__() and then use it.next() to run through all the its elements, checking if it is done by either using it.hasNext() or listening for a StopIteration exception. If you want programmers to define the behavior in that construct by defining an fooList.each() method rather than fooList.iterator() (or whatever), go ahead. I am just not sure why you would want to name your iterator generation method each. But if thats really what you want, go ahead.

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list.each(v) would seem to be the logical solution

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