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There is a recursive implementation of computing factorial N on Perl.

sub fact {
  my ($n) = shift;
  return $n if $n <= 2;
  return $n * fact($n - 1);
}

Can someone explain me where Perl holds intermediate results before function gives a result?

UPD and how I can see them by using debugger or by use something else?

From answers I was explained that this values keeps in a stack but how I can see these values from the stack?

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4  
As in, the result of recursively calling fact, or $n, or...? In the stack. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jan 1 '13 at 0:33
    
@minitech do you know how to get access to those intermediate results from the stack? –  edem Jan 1 '13 at 13:18
2  
"The stack" is not explicit in Perl. You access $n by simply using that variable. Calling a function simply evaluates to the return value. Perl does the magic for you. If you are trying to solve a concrete problem, saying what you are trying to do, instead of how, might help. (If this is an academic problem, I still dont quite get it) –  amon Jan 1 '13 at 13:36
    
@edem, You are accessing those intermediate values using the multiplication operator. You could also access them usng the assignment operator. my $f = fact($n - 1); –  ikegami Jan 2 '13 at 14:18
1  
@edem, It uses the stack then too. Each of the arguments are on the stack, and print gets them from there. Oversimplified: print($a, $b, $c*$d) is push @stack, $a; push @stack, $b; push @stack, $c; push @stack, $d; multiply; print; –  ikegami Jan 4 '13 at 16:38

4 Answers 4

The scalar returned by $n is stored on the stack.

This is what the stack looks like just before calling fact:

  • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 0
  • List:
    • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 1
    • List:
      • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 2
      • List:
        • Scalar returned by $n-1 in recursion level 2
        • Scalar returned by \&fact in recursion level 2

This is what the stack looks like just after calling fact:

  • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 0
  • List:
    • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 1
    • List:
      • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 2
      • Scalar returned by fact($n - 1) in recursion level 2

At this point, the multiplication operator will multiply the last two values on the stack, and place the result on the stack.

  • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 0
  • List:
    • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 1
    • List:
      • Scalar returned by $n * fact($n - 1) in recursion level 2

Then the sub returns,

  • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 0
  • List:
    • Scalar returned by $n in recursion level 1
    • Scalar returned by fact($n - 1) in recursion level 1

And so on.

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I understand how it works and what will be returned from each recursion level but I don't know how it looks in a stack. –  edem Jan 4 '13 at 9:10
    
Each bullet is an item on the stack. It's a kind of array. –  ikegami Jan 4 '13 at 16:37

With the recursion any of the arguments that are passed in each call go on the call frame/ stack. By using Carp & cluck you can see the call frames. Intermediate results are calculated while the stack unwinds on reaching the base case ($v == 1). Could it be in CPU register only? And operator (*) multiplies this intermediate result with $v that is on the stack. Also checkout this article.

#!/usr/bin/env  perl

use strict;
use IO::Handle;
use Carp qw(cluck);

STDOUT->autoflush(1);
STDERR->autoflush(1);

sub factorial {
    my $v = shift;

    dummy_func();
    return 1 if $v == 1;
    print "Variable v value: $v and it's address:", \$v, "\ncurrent sub factorial addr:", \&factorial, "\n","-"x40;
    return $v * factorial($v - 1);
}

sub dummy_func {
    cluck;
}

factorial(5);

Also running in debug mode will help.

perl -d factorial.pl

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Thanks for posting your answer! Please be sure to read the FAQ on Self-Promotion carefully. Also note that it is required that you post a disclaimer every time you link to your own site/product. –  Andrew Barber Feb 21 '13 at 1:56

Since $n is declared as my $n, it's a lexically scoped variable and is stored in the stack and not in the system table. See Perl Variables via my() for more information.

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2  
1. Lexical variables are not kept on the stack. They are kept on the pad. Roughly it's a structure that looks like $pad[$recursion_depth][$var_idx]. 2. This doesn't answer the OP's question since he doesn't want to know where $n is stored, but where the value returned by $n is stored. –  ikegami Jan 1 '13 at 17:05

Intermediate results of any call are kept on the stack, just like local variables within a function.

return $n * fact($n - 1);

is processed equivalently to:

my $temp = fact($n - 1);
return $n * $temp;

UPDATE: I see you're also interested in where the product is held before returning it. That's also in a temporary on the stack, so it's equivalent to:

my $temp1 = fact($n - 1);
my $temp2 = $n * $temp1;
return $temp2;
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In this example we can get access to the $temp var just add line with print $temp, but in my example I cannot do it –  edem Jan 1 '13 at 13:17
    
Why can't you add $temp to your example? –  Barmar Jan 1 '13 at 13:21
    
Cause we don't know which value of $n will be set. Another words I don't need to just print value and I want to know how Perl keeps them into itself. –  edem Jan 1 '13 at 15:55
1  
I don't know what you're talking about, there's nothing about printing in my answer. Perl (and every other language you're likely to use) keeps the return value of function calls on the stack, in unnamed temporary variables. This is just basic computer science. –  Barmar Jan 1 '13 at 16:45
3  
Lexical variables are not kept on the stack. They are kept on the pad. So your two snippets are not equivalent (even if you hadn't changed the evaluation order). –  ikegami Jan 1 '13 at 16:47

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