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I'm working on a Cocoa for Mac OS X application that offers a selection of options for NSRegularExpression searches. Those options are expressed as an enum like so:

enum {
NSRegularExpressionCaseInsensitive             = 1 << 0,
NSRegularExpressionAllowCommentsAndWhitespace  = 1 << 1,
NSRegularExpressionIgnoreMetacharacters        = 1 << 2,
NSRegularExpressionDotMatchesLineSeparators    = 1 << 3,
NSRegularExpressionAnchorsMatchLines           = 1 << 4,
NSRegularExpressionUseUnixLineSeparators       = 1 << 5,
NSRegularExpressionUseUnicodeWordBoundaries    = 1 << 6
};
typedef NSUInteger NSRegularExpressionOptions;

I want to have the user select from any of these options (it's a series of checkboxes), and then pass the results to the method regularExpressionWithPattern:options:error:. I'm receiving those options as integers, so the user might select 0 and 5, for example.

I can't figure out what the proper technique is here. The options parameter takes an integer with a bitwise OR operator, but how do I build that dynamically from the user's selection in these checkboxes, so I can pass it into that method call?

Here's a naive and incorrect attempt:

for (NSButtonCell * cell in [sender selectedCells]) {
    NSNumber * tag = [NSNumber numberWithInteger:[cell tag] - 1];
    [self.optionsString stringByAppendingString:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@|", [tag stringValue]]];
}

Obviously, options doesn't take an NSString. But I hope this clarifies what I'm doing so you understand the question!

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You just need to bitwise-or the selected options. The |= operator lets you do this tersely.

If your cells are tagged 0 through 6:

NSUInteger options = 0;
for (NSButtonCell * cell in [sender selectedCells])
    options |= (1 << [cell tag]);

I don't quite understand why you're subtracting one from [cell tag] in your sample code.

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Laziness: I tagged the options starting with 1. :-) –  Aaron Vegh Jan 1 '13 at 2:21
1  
Conveniently, there is an |= operator, saving you one instance of the word options in the expression. –  Peter Hosey Jan 1 '13 at 5:13
    
Thanks. I worked that in. –  noa Jan 1 '13 at 16:11
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if you use the the int values of the bits. (i.e. 1, 2, 4, 8.. etc.)

you can use them as is for the True selections.

NSRegularExpressionOptions selectedOptions = 0;
for (NSButtonCell * cell in [sender selectedCells]) {
    selectedOptions = selectedOptions | tag.unsignedIntegerValue;
}

because the values are flags, you could use the bitwise or ( | ) to result in any flags that are on in either of the values.

Just be sure to set the tags to the int values you want to use. (i.e. 1,2,4,8,16,32 and 64)

Or you could just add them up.

the bit value of them are as follows.

enum {
    NSRegularExpressionCaseInsensitive             = 1 << 0,
    NSRegularExpressionAllowCommentsAndWhitespace  = 1 << 1,
    NSRegularExpressionIgnoreMetacharacters        = 1 << 2,
    NSRegularExpressionDotMatchesLineSeparators    = 1 << 3,
    NSRegularExpressionAnchorsMatchLines           = 1 << 4,
    NSRegularExpressionUseUnixLineSeparators       = 1 << 5,
    NSRegularExpressionUseUnicodeWordBoundaries    = 1 << 6
};

    NSRegularExpressionCaseInsensitive             == 0b00000001; // (1)
    NSRegularExpressionAllowCommentsAndWhitespace  == 0b00000010; // (2)
    NSRegularExpressionIgnoreMetacharacters        == 0b00000100; // (4)
    NSRegularExpressionDotMatchesLineSeparators    == 0b00001000; // (8)
    NSRegularExpressionAnchorsMatchLines           == 0b00010000; // (16)
    NSRegularExpressionUseUnixLineSeparators       == 0b00100000; // (32)
    NSRegularExpressionUseUnicodeWordBoundaries    == 0b01000000; // (64)

their values are equivalent both through "bitwise or ( | )" as well as addition

    Via Addition            NSUInteger value = 2 + 4;
    or bitwise or ( | )     NSUInteger value = 2 | 4;
    Even with Bitshifting   NSUInteger value = (1 << 1) + (1 << 2);
                            NSUInteger value = (1 << 1) | (1 << 2);

     0b00000010   (2)
    +0b00000100  +(4)
    -----------   ---
     0b00000110   (6)

where the bitwise or comes in handy is turning flags on.

       (addition)
     0b00000010   (2)
    +0b00000110  +(6)
    -----------   ---
     0b00001000   (8)



       (bitwise or)
     0b00000010   (2)
    |0b00000110  |(6)
    -----------   ---
     0b00000110   (6)

because or only turns on flags in "Both" values. you get the same thing you started with.

a more complex example would be this.

       (bitwise or)
     0b00010010   (18)
    |0b00000110  |(6)
    -----------   ---
     0b00010110   (22)


       (addition)
     0b00010010   (18)
    +0b00000110  +(6)
    -----------   ---
     0b00011000   (24)

as you can see. they have different purposes. and knowledge of the difference is important.

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