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I'm trying to set an event that fires when anything WITHOUT the .four class is clicked. However, it fires when things with the .four class are clicked, even though I'm using e.stopPropagation().

$("html").one("click", ":not(.four)", function(e){
   e.stopPropagation();
   console.log("Something without class 'four' was clicked that had class: " + $(e.srcElement).attr("class") );
});

​(jsFiddle Demo)

This does not work either:

$("html").not('.four').on("click", function(e){

Both output: Something without class 'four' was clicked that had class: four

I'm having tons of trouble with :not() and I suspect a lot of it might have to do with my browser supporting CSS3 :not() now, but I still can't understand this simple issue.

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+1 Good question. I'm on it. – Šime Vidas Jan 1 '13 at 1:27
    
So you just want to ensure that when .four is clicked that the event doesn't fire, right? I'm just trying to be clear. – Ohgodwhy Jan 1 '13 at 1:47
    
@Ohgodwhy Yes, every element on the page except .four should have a click event delegated by html. – Jason Whitted Jan 1 '13 at 1:49
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your code:

$("html").one("click", ":not(.four)", function(e){
    e.stopPropagation();
    // other code
});

sets up global event delegation for the click event type. This means that whenever a click event is triggered at any element on the page, jQuery will check if that element matches the provided selector - ":not(.four)" - and if it does, jQuery will invoke the handler on that element.

This is what happens when you click on a .four element:

  1. The original element at which the click event is triggered is obviously the .four element. jQuery checks if that element matches the ":not(.four)" selector. Since it doesn't, the handler is not invoked on that element.

  2. Click events bubble up the DOM tree. As propagation for this click event has not been canceled yet, the event triggers at the next element, which is the parent of the original element - the .two element in your demo. Again, jQuery checks if the element matches the selector. Since it does, the handler is invoked on that element.

As you can see, your handler will be invoked even if you click on a .four element. In order to prevent the code from being executed when a .four element is clicked, you have to explicitly check within the handler - basically what Jason's solution does.

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1  
Ah, of course: the propagation isn't stopped until it fires! – brentonstrine Jan 1 '13 at 1:56
    
Great catch, Šime. – Jason Whitted Jan 1 '13 at 2:00
1  
in reality there is no propagation since click is delegated to html and selector is the target. Event is already ocuring at top of treee. So stopPropogation isn't effective in delegation – charlietfl Jan 1 '13 at 2:00
    
yes but could be great to find out a solution :/ if anyone has, also cause this is a big jquery bug as i can see from the jquery doc – sbaaaang Jan 1 '13 at 2:00
1  
@charlietfl No, it' not. e.stopPropagation() cancels the propagation successfully. OP's handler is only invoked once. – Šime Vidas Jan 1 '13 at 2:03

Here is a solution I want to contribute. Put this listener alongside the other one:

$("html").one("click", ".four", function(e){
       e.stopPropagation();
});
$("html").one("click", function(e){
    // other code
});

It will prevent propagation on .four and "steal" or "catch" it from bubbling up to the other listener. It might be helpful to have the "catcher" listener at a lower level than the other one, depending on if it bubbles up to one before the other.

See the jsFiddle demo, working, finally!

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite working for me. If you click .four twice it selects it. Because each one of the click events is getting registered as a .one() – Jason Whitted Jan 1 '13 at 2:26
    
Because it is de-regestering itself. For the purpose of this demo, you can turn the "catcher" to .on() and it will work no matter how many times you click. – brentonstrine Jan 1 '13 at 2:33
1  
You can shorten your code a little like this: $("html").one("click", ".four", false); By passing false instead of a function, jQuery will assign a handler that invokes stopPropagation and preventDefault. – the system Jan 1 '13 at 2:43

As Šime Vidas pointed out, this is the desired workaround:

function doThisOnce(e) {
   e.stopPropagation();

   if(!$(this).is(".four")){
        console.log("Something without class 'four' was clicked that had class: " + $(e.srcElement).attr("class"));
        $(".one").addClass("pretty");
    }
    else {
        // need to rebind the click event
        $(document).one("click", "*", doThisOnce);
    }
}
$(document).one("click", "*", doThisOnce);
share|improve this answer
    
That's a good workaround, though I'd have to re-register the listener again (since it's .one() not .on()) but ultimately I'd rather figure out what the deal is with :not() instead of giving up on it without even knowing what I was doing wrong. – brentonstrine Jan 1 '13 at 1:23
    
I agree. Not finding any love in their bug tracking software. Kind of a weird issue to search for. – Jason Whitted Jan 1 '13 at 1:26
    
not solving issue with not() – sbaaaang Jan 1 '13 at 1:35
1  
@Badaboooooom Which is exactly why I said it's a bug in my answer. It is a legitimate workaround. – Jason Whitted Jan 1 '13 at 1:36
    
sure, but could be great to fix issues not to workaround , workarounds are for newbies :D joking – sbaaaang Jan 1 '13 at 1:37

Here's another approach using the event target:

$(document).one("click", function(e){
    if( ! $(e.target).closest('.four').length ){
         console.log("Something without class 'four' was clicked that had class: " + $(e.srcElement).attr("class") );
     }
});

closest() will match children of the class as well as the class element itself

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