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whats the difference between the 2 below declarations?

var vehiclePrototype = function{
    function init(carModel) {
        this.model = carModel;
    }


};

and

var vehiclePrototype = {
    init: function (carModel) {
        this.model = carModel;
    }

};
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closed as unclear what you're asking by shiplu.mokadd.im, gnat, Amit Joki, mu 無, Patrick Hofman Mar 30 at 17:13

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
the first isn't even valid JS. –  OneOfOne Jan 1 '13 at 1:46
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the first, init() is only available within the outer function. vehiclePrototype.init() won't work.

In the second, you are creating an object and assigning a function to the init property. vehiclePrototype.init() will work.

Also, you have a syntax error in your first example. You would need to use var vehiclePrototype = function () { for your first line.

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2  
I apologize, I thought the term applied here. Can you elaborate on the difference? –  Brad Jan 1 '13 at 1:52
1  
Closure = function that accesses (closes over) its outer scope. –  Jan Dvorak Jan 1 '13 at 1:53
1  
@zerkms wikipedia will do? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closure_(computer_science) "In computer science, a closure (also lexical closure or function closure) is a function or reference to a function ..." –  Jan Dvorak Jan 1 '13 at 1:56
1  
@Brad: the nested init function doesn't use any variables out of its scope. –  zerkms Jan 1 '13 at 1:59
2  
@Brad: I'm not sure about particular internal JS engine point of view, but from terminology point of view - as long as it only uses variables from its scope - it's just a function, not a closure. –  zerkms Jan 1 '13 at 2:01
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First of all the top is broken, so naively the top is broken and bottom is an object literal containing a function.

Assuming correct syntax the first still doesnt do anything, because init is scoped to the function and has no way of escaping to the outside. The difference is the top is an empty function which is different than an object literal containing a function.

Perhaps you wanted this:

var vehiclePrototype = function () {
    this.init = function (carModel) {
        this.model = carModel;
    };
};
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