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What is the difference?

public class MyClass<? extends MySuperClass> {

     private T data ;
     private MyClass<? extends MySuperClass> parent ;

}

and

public class MyClass<T extends MySuperClass> {

     private T data ;
     // the below line - no compilation errors
     private MyClass<? extends MySuperClass> parent ;
     // the below line - compilation errors 
     private MyCLass<T extends MySuperClass> child ;


}

When to use what?

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closed as not a real question by Lion, AVD, Greg Kopff, Bohemian, Brian Roach Jan 1 '13 at 5:23

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
T data makes no sense in the first code block and shouldn't even compile. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 1 '13 at 4:13
    
Please don't simply down vote! Explain the reason for down vote or explain the difference? –  JAGAMOT Jan 1 '13 at 4:14
    
I didn't down vote (if that comment was meant for me). But more importantly, have you tried to compile the two code blocks? If so you should tell us the result. If not, you should do it without delay. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 1 '13 at 4:15
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels - i guess we crossed posting comments, my comment was originally meant to who ever down voted it. Thanks! Can you plz explain the issue with the second class? –  JAGAMOT Jan 1 '13 at 4:16
    
I already tried compiling, you are right T doesn't make sense in the first example. How about second? Trying to understand the issue here. –  JAGAMOT Jan 1 '13 at 4:17

1 Answer 1

<T>, <T>, and <?> are completely different.

  • class X<T> declares a generic class with a type parameter (placeholder) named T. Within that class, T is a valid type.

  • X<T> something is a variable or field declaration. It declares a variable whose type is generic, and specifies the value of the generic parameter.

  • X<?> something is also a variable or field declaration. It declares a variable whose type is generic, but does not specify the value of the generic parameter.


When you create a generic class, you can optionally add constraints to the generic parameter, specifying what types are allowed when people declare instances (variables) of that class.

Thus, class X<T extends SomeClass> creates a generic class with a less-flexible type parameter.


When you use a generic class (eg, private Collection<String> myStrings), you obviously cannot specify constraints on the value of the generic parameter (since you're already specifying the actual value).

Thus, private Collection<String extends Comparable> myStrings makes no sense.


When you use a generic class with a wildcard (or unbound) parameter (eg, private Collection<?> myThingies), you can optionally specify constraints on the whatever the parameter might be. This allows you to assume things about the (unknown) value of the generic parameter.

Thus, private Collection<? extends Runnable> myRunners is a collection of some unknown type that guarantees that the type implements Runnable. Therefore, you can call .run() on the things in the collection.
However, you can't put anything in the collection, since you don't know what type the collection is actually supposed to hold.

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