Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have file file1 containing

123 foo
45  bar
678 foobar
...

and file2 containing

xyz
foo
foobar
...

I'd like to get a file with only rows from file1 whose second column appear in file2:

123 foo
678 foobar
...

The columns are separated by tabs. I'd like to run this from Mac OS X command-line if possible.

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is definately a job for join:

$ join -1 2 -2 1 <(sort file) <(sort file2)
foo 123
foobar 678
share|improve this answer

Using Perl:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %seen;
open (my $input2, "<", "input2") or die("open input2: $!");
while (<$input2>) { chomp; $seen{$_}++; }
close $input2;

open (my $input1, "<", "input1") or die("open input1: $!");
while (<$input1>) {
  chomp;
  my $key = (split (/\s+/))[1];
  print "$_\n" if $seen{$key};
}
close $input1;

Or you can do this using join and sort:

sort input2 > input2sorted
join -1 2 -2 1 input1 input2sorted

Also next time you can post your take on the question and ask a more specific question.

share|improve this answer
    
Why it needs sort first? –  qazwsx Jan 1 '13 at 8:24
    
join arguments should be in sorted order –  perreal Jan 1 '13 at 8:28

Try this :

grep -f file2 file1 > Output.txt

file1

123 foo
45  bar
678 foobar

file2

xyz
foo
foobar

Output.txt

123 foo
678 foobar
share|improve this answer

Here's one way using awk:

awk -F "\t" 'FNR==NR { a[$0]++; next } $2 in a' file2 file1

Results:

123 foo
678 foobar
share|improve this answer

The question is related to this one. Consequently, here's one possible solution, based on the answer of sudo_O:

awk '{print $0}' file2 | grep -f - file1
share|improve this answer
2  
I'm famous :] The awk step is unnecessary in this situation as file 2 only has one column so just grep -f file2 file1 will do it. –  iiSeymour Jan 1 '13 at 15:08
    
Just giving credits when copy-&-pasting a solution... which turned out to be a good idea since I could have obviously reflected a bit more on it and dropped the awk part :). Thanks for the clarification. –  skitnik Jan 1 '13 at 21:06
awk 'FNR==NR{a[$0];next}($2 in a)' file2 file1

check here or here for more examples:

share|improve this answer

Here's a perl option that uses File::Slurp to read your files. map is used to initialize a hash with the 'keys,' and a regex gets the last column entry that's used in grep to pass through only matching lines if the entry's in the hash:

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Slurp qw/read_file/;

my %keys = map { chomp; $_ => 1 } read_file 'file2.txt';
print for grep { /\t(.+)$/; $keys{$1} } read_file 'file1.txt';

Output on your data sets:

123 foo
678 foobar
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.