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I'm still new to C++ and I can't seem to find the exact answer elsewhere. I am trying to initialize a Box object that requires 2 floats in the constructor. Box is derived from Game Object.

I tried Box *box = new Box(20,20);

    class GameObject {
        public: 
            GameObject::GameObject(float Posx, float Posy) {
                posx = Posx;
                posy = Posy;
            };
        protected: //Positions
            float posx;
            float posy;

            virtual void setPosition(float x, float y) { posx = x; posy = y;};

        };


        class Box : GameObject { // Box is Derived from GameObject
        public:

            float sizex;
            float sizey;

            void setSize(float x, float y) {sizex = x; sizey = y;};

        };
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2  
Show us a complete program, or at least where the error actually occurs. http://sscce.org. –  chris Jan 1 '13 at 7:08
    
And there is no need of GameObject:: while defining functions inside the class body. It would rather give you error. –  Coding Mash Jan 1 '13 at 7:09
    
Welcome then to the most horrible language. I'm wondering why so much programmers (me too!) are in-love with it. –  Mark Garcia Jan 1 '13 at 7:10
1  
Note that Box inherits privately from GameObject, there is a really high chance that you meant class Box : public GameObject instead... –  K-ballo Jan 1 '13 at 7:15
1  
@Tikitaco: Please don't try to write Java code in C++, you will do all sort of things wrong.... –  K-ballo Jan 1 '13 at 7:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A GameObject requires a position to be initialized, you simply cannot create a GameObject without that information. A Box is implemented-in-terms-of a GameObject, so a Box needs to be initialized with a position as well.

You need to create a constructor for Box that will take care of initializing its GameObject position. Like this:

class Box : GameObject {
public:
    Box(float Posx, float Posy) : GameObject( Posx, Posy ) {}

    /*...*/
};

And presumably you will need a way to construct a Box out of a position and a size:

class Box : GameObject {
public:
    Box(float Posx, float Posy, float Sizex, float Sizey)
      : GameObject( Posx, Posy )
      , sizex( Sizex ), sizey( Sizey )
    {}

    /*...*/
};

Finally, you could also add a constructor for Box that says that a default constructed Box starts at position 0,0 and has no size:

class Box : GameObject {
public:
    Box() : GameObject( 0, 0 ), sizex( 0 ), sizey( 0 ) {}

    /*...*/
};
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Worked perfectly thanks! –  Tikitaco Jan 1 '13 at 20:43

As I'm writing this, the posted code is as follows:

class GameObject {


public: 
    GameObject::GameObject(float Posx, float Posy) {
        posx = Posx;
        posy = Posy;
    };
protected:
    float posx;
    float posy;

    virtual void setPosition(float x, float y) { posx = x; posy = y;};

};


class Box : GameObject {
public:

    float sizex;
    float sizey;

    void setSize(float x, float y) {sizex = x; sizey = y;};

};

That won't compile because class GameObject has no default constructor that the generated default constructor for class Box can use.

One fix is to define a constructor for class Box.


While you're at it, you probably want to use public inheritance.

For class inheritance is private by default (it's opposite for struct).

Wherever you find yourself using private inheritance, consider containment instead.


Also, since e.g. the literal 3.14 is a double, not a float, it's generally a good idea to use double instead of float.

It can be faster.

And it's certainly less awkward.

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