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I've seen a few different ways to iterate over a Dictionary in C#. Is there a standard way?

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20  
So, for those of you keeping track at home, no. There is no standard way. :) –  Jesse Smith Jul 19 '13 at 15:09
3  
I am surprised there are many answers to this question, along with one upvoted 923 times.. (uses foreach ofcourse).. I'd argue, or at the least add that if you have to iterate over a dictionary, chances are you are using it incorrectly / inappropriately.. I had to make this comment, because I have seen dictionaries being abused in ways which IMHO were not appropriate... Yes there can be rare circumstances when you iterate the dictionary, rather than lookup, which is what it is designed for.. Please bear that in mind, before wondering how to iterate over a dictionary. –  Vikas Gupta Sep 18 at 6:52

16 Answers 16

up vote 1039 down vote accepted
foreach(KeyValuePair<string, string> entry in MyDic)
{
    // do something with entry.Value or entry.Key
}
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166  
I'd use var instead of KeyValuePair<String, String> though... –  Svish Jan 18 '10 at 17:10
367  
Skip using 'var'. It makes your code harder to read since it hides the actual type of object. Sure its a fancy little shortcut, but it forces anyone who is reading your code to use an IDE to translate it for them. –  MonkeyWrench Jan 13 '12 at 20:17
103  
@MonkeyWrench: I strongly disagree. Using type inference makes the code so much easier to read. Ruby and other "typeless" languages are certainly not harder to read because the type info is missing. –  Alkaline Dec 14 '12 at 4:09
155  
And I will strongly disagree with your statement. Var is an abomination in strongly typed languages. There's a reason its called "strongly typed". If the above code was changed to "foreach( var entry in MyDic)", there's no way you can easily tell me what type the variable "entry" is when reviewing the code without an IDE and specifically investigating the variable. It makes it easier to write bad code, something often seen in languages like Ruby. Why is so hard to just explicitly state the variable's type? –  MonkeyWrench Dec 21 '12 at 19:50
80  
@MonkeyWrench I'd much rather review code that used "var" instead of "KeyValuePair<string,string>" in this foreach loop. If I can't easily infer the types then either I'm not paying attention or the code needs to be refactored. There are pros and cons on both sides of the "var" question -- good uses and bad. To categorically call it an abomination is unfortunate. Judicious use of "var" makes code much more readable, in my opinion. If some teams choose to ban it because of abuse, that may be a good choice for them, and I'd respect it if I joined their team. –  pettys Jan 9 '13 at 15:16

If you are trying to use a generic Dictionary in C# like you would use an associative array in another language:

foreach(KeyValuePair<string, string> item in myDictionary)
{
  foo(item.Key);
  bar(item.Value);
}

Or, if you only need to iterate over the collection of keys, use

foreach(var item in myDictionary.Keys)
{
  foo(item);
}

And lastly, if you're only interested in the values:

foreach(var item in myDictionary.Values)
{
  foo(item);
}

(Take note that the var keyword is an optional C# 3.0 feature, you could also use the exact type of your keys/values here)

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3  
the var feature is most required for your first code block :) –  nawfal Nov 1 '13 at 14:26
1  
+1 for a balanced view of different ways you can iterate and what scenarios you'd use each in. Like many things, "it depends"! –  Jeff Bridgman Aug 6 at 19:46

In some cases you may need a counter that may be provided by for-loop implementation. For that, LINQ provides ElementAt which enables the following:

for (int index = 0; index < dictionary.Count; index++) {
  var item = dictionary.ElementAt(index);
  var itemKey = item.Key;
  var itemValue = item.Value;
}
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11  
To use the '.ElementAt' method, remember: using System.Linq; This is not incluted in fx. auto generated test classes. –  Tinia Nov 24 '11 at 14:47
4  
This is the way to go if you are modifying the values associated with the keys. Otherwise an exception is thrown when modifying and using foreach(). –  Mike de Klerk Apr 3 '13 at 7:18
1  
think this is the only answer with a for loop, cheers –  CodeBlend Jul 3 '13 at 14:50
2  
Be careful when using this. See here: stackoverflow.com/a/2254480/253938 –  RenniePet Jan 14 at 18:54

Depends on whether you're after the keys or the values...

From the MSDN Dictionary<(Of <(TKey, TValue>)>) Class description:

   // When you use foreach to enumerate dictionary elements,
    // the elements are retrieved as KeyValuePair objects.
    Console.WriteLine();
    foreach( KeyValuePair<string, string> kvp in openWith )
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Key = {0}, Value = {1}", 
            kvp.Key, kvp.Value);
    }

    // To get the values alone, use the Values property.
    Dictionary<string, string>.ValueCollection valueColl =
        openWith.Values;

    // The elements of the ValueCollection are strongly typed
    // with the type that was specified for dictionary values.
    Console.WriteLine();
    foreach( string s in valueColl )
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Value = {0}", s);
    }

    // To get the keys alone, use the Keys property.
    Dictionary<string, string>.KeyCollection keyColl =
        openWith.Keys;

    // The elements of the KeyCollection are strongly typed
    // with the type that was specified for dictionary keys.
    Console.WriteLine();
    foreach( string s in keyColl )
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Key = {0}", s);
    }
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I would say foreach is the standard way, though it obviously depends on what you're looking for

foreach(var value in my_dictionary) {
  ...
}

Is that what you're looking for?

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var is available in 3.0 and higher only –  Pablo Fernandez Sep 26 '08 at 18:25
1  
good point, but just use the proper type then –  George Mauer Sep 26 '08 at 18:47
3  
Um, isn't naming the item "value" rather confusing? You would typically be using syntax like "value.Key" and "value.Value", which isn't very intuitive for anyone else who will be reading the code, especially if they aren't familiar with how the .Net Dictionary is implemented. –  RenniePet Jan 11 at 12:09
    
Agreed, I usually do something like kv –  George Mauer Jan 11 at 17:06

There are plenty of options. My personal favorite is by KeyValuePair

Dictionary<string,object> myDictionary = new Dictionary<string,object>();
//Populate your dictionary here

Foreach (KeyValuePair<string,object> kvp in myDictionary)
{
     //Do some interesting things;
}

You can also use the Keys and Values Collections

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You suggested below to iterate

Dictionary<string,object> myDictionary = new Dictionary<string,object>();
//Populate your dictionary here

foreach (KeyValuePair<string,object> kvp in myDictionary) {
    //Do some interesting things;
}

FYI, foreach doesn't work if the value are of type object.

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4  
-1 for the last line. What do you mean? –  nawfal Nov 1 '13 at 14:30

Use the built in support for the iterator pattern, the foreach key word.

If using a non generic Dictionary, simply use the KeyValuePair type for the different items:

foreach(KeyValuePair item in myDictionary)
{
    DoStuffWith(item);
}

The generic version is almost identical, apart from defining the types in the KeyValuePair to be the same as the dictionary:

foreach(KeyValuePair<Tkey, Tvalue> item in myDictionary)
{
    DoStuffWith(item);
}
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1  
note that you can't modify 'item' –  serhio Jun 19 '10 at 0:45
    
I don't think there is non generic KeyValuePair –  Sriram Sakthivel Nov 29 '13 at 11:07

I found this method in the documentation for the DictionaryBase class on MSDN:

foreach (DictionaryEntry de in myDictionary)
{
     //Do some stuff with de.Value or de.Key
}

This was the only one I was able to get functioning correctly in a class that inherited from the DictionaryBase.

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This looks like when using the non-generics version of Dictionary... i.e. prior to .NET framework 2.0. –  joedotnot Apr 26 at 13:21

I appreciate this question has already had a lot of responses but I wanted to throw in a little research.

Iterating over a dictionary can be rather slow when compared with iterating over something like an array. In my tests an iteration over an array took 0.015003 seconds whereas an iteration over a dictionary (with the same number of elements) took 0.0365073 seconds that's three times longer! Although I have seen much bigger differences. For comparison a List was somewhere in between at 0.00215043 seconds.

However, that is like comparing apples and oranges. My point is that iterating over dictionaries is slow.

Dictionaries are optimised for lookups, so with that in mind I've created two methods. One simply does a foreach, the other iterates the keys then looks up.

    public static string Normal(Dictionary<string, string> dictionary)
    {
        string value;
        int count = 0;
        foreach (var kvp in dictionary)
        {
            value = kvp.Value;
            count++;
        }

        return "Normal";
    }

This one loads the keys and iterates over them instead (I did also try pulling the keys into a string[] but the difference was negligible.

    public static string Keys(Dictionary<string, string> dictionary)
    {
        string value;
        int count = 0;
        foreach (var key in dictionary.Keys)
        {
            value = dictionary[key];
            count++;
        }

        return "Keys";
    }

With this example the normal foreach test took 0.0310062 and the keys version took 0.2205441. Loading all the keys and iterating over all the lookups is clearly a LOT slower!

For a final test I've performed my iteration ten times to see if there are any benefits to using the keys here (by this point I was just curious):

Here's the RunTest method if that helps you visualise what's going on.

    private static string RunTest<T>(T dictionary, Func<T, string> function)
    {            
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
        string name = null;
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            name = function(dictionary);
        }
        DateTime end = DateTime.Now;
        var duration = end.Subtract(start);
        return string.Format("{0} took {1} seconds", name, duration.TotalSeconds);
    }

Here the normal foreach run took 0.2820564 seconds (around ten times longer than a single iteration took - as you'd expect). The iteration over the keys took 2.2249449 seconds.

Edited To Add: Reading some of the other answers made me question what would happen if I used Dictionary instead of Dictionary. In this example the array took 0.0120024 seconds, the list 0.0185037 seconds and the dictionary 0.0465093 seconds. It's reasonable to expect that the data type makes a difference on how much slower the dictionary is.

What are my Conclusions?

  • Avoid iterating over a dictionary if you can, they are substantially slower than iterating over an array with the same data in it.
  • If you do choose to iterate over a dictionary don't try to be too clever, although slower you could do a lot worse than using the standard foreach method.
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+1 for going through the analysis of the foreach syntax. –  hlin117 Aug 11 at 18:11

If say, you want to iterate over the values collection by default, I believe you can implement IEnumerable<>, Where T is the type of the values object in the dictionary, and "this" is a Dictionary.

public new IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
{
   return this.Values.GetEnumerator();
}
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Sometimes if you only needs the values to be enumerated, use the dictionary's value collection:

foreach(var value in dictionary.Values)
{
    // do something with entry.Value only
}

Reported by this post which states it is the fastest method: http://alexpinsker.blogspot.hk/2010/02/c-fastest-way-to-iterate-over.html

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Iterating over Dictionary either with for or foreach does not guarantee the chronologic order of items since Dictionary orders entries by their key type (e.g Dictionary - order by string, Dictionary order by DateTime etc.) so the only way to ensure an iteration which is ordered by insertion (as with for loops on List) is to inherit Dictionary and implement IEnumerable and iterating by order of insertion.

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I have an application on which I have a tab control with several tabpages.

Every tabpage has several checkboxes and radiobuttons.

The checkboxes and radiobuttons are all inside groupboxes that are inside the tabpages.

Several checkboxes/radiobuttons have different .Name but identical .Text

When I check a checkbox/radiobutton, all other checkboxes/radiobuttons with the same .Text must be disabled so that I can not check that controls anymore.

This application has to do with the assignment of pins of a micro controller to a function. Once a pin is selected to a function, lets say, PWM, I can't select that pin to other functions, for example,a UART because it was disabled when I clicked on that pin to be used as PWM.

Here is how I solved this problem

I created a dictionary with lists of controls. The key is the .Text of each control found on the application, the value is a list of all controls that have the same .Text

Dictionary<string, List<System.Windows.Forms.Control>> Pins = new Dictionary<string, List<System.Windows.Forms.Control>>();


void ScanControls()
{
    foreach (Control tpage in tc1.Controls)
    {
        if (tpage is TabPage)
        {
            if (!tpage.Tag.ToString().ToUpper().Contains("IGNORE")) //Some tab pages can be ignored
            {
                foreach (Control gb in tpage.Controls)
                {
                    if (gb is GroupBox)
                    {
                        if (!gb.Tag.ToString().ToUpper().Contains("IGNORE")) //Some group boxes can be ignored
                        {
                            foreach (Control gbControl in gb.Controls)
                            {
                                if (!gbControl.Tag.ToString().ToUpper().Contains("IGNORE"))//Some CheckBoxes or Radiobuttons can be ignored
                                {
                                    if ((gbControl is CheckBox) || (gbControl is RadioButton))
                                    {
                                        InsertControlIntoDictionary(gbControl);                                                
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

void InsertControlIntoDictionary(System.Windows.Forms.Control c)
{
    if (!Pins.ContainsKey(c.Text)) //First time? Add new key
    {
        Pins.Add(c.Text, new List<System.Windows.Forms.Control> { c });
    }
    else //insert control into the existing key
    {
        Pins[c.Text].Add(c);
    }
}



void UncheckAllControls()
{
    foreach (string s in Pins.Keys)
    {
        foreach (Control c in Pins[s])
        {
            if (!c.Tag.ToString().ToUpper().Contains("IGNORE"))
            {
                /* check box or radio button? */
                if (c is CheckBox)
                {
                    ((CheckBox)c).Checked = false;
                }
                else if (c is RadioButton)
                {
                    ((RadioButton)c).Checked = false;
                }
            }
        }
    }            
}

Hope it helps

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I will take the advantage of .NET 4.0+ and provide an updated answer to the originally accepted one:

foreach(var entry in MyDic)
{
    // do something with entry.Value or entry.Key
}
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Use combination for foreach & Dictionary key to iterate.

Iterating by key is a fast way to iterate through dictionary.

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