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I'm still trying to learn how to use ASM with C++ and I ran into an issue. All I want to do is read the pointer of an integer in a program.

The code of the program which is writing to this integer is as follows:

00A3EB6C - mov [edi+0C],eax

Now, all I would like to do is to get the pointer [edi+0C] at that address. The reason I would like to do it this way is because I have not been able to find a reliable memory pointer any other way.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

I'm sorry if it's badly worded, it's difficult to explain.

EDIT: My final goal is to display the value of the integer at the pointer [edi+0C] at the address 00A3EB6C in a label on my Windows Form.

I am using a DLL attached to an external application, just to clarify.

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closed as not a real question by interjay, WhozCraig, hochl, Andy Hayden, Ram kiran Jan 2 '13 at 3:31

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
The pointer is the value of edi plus 0xC. I'm not sure what else you need. –  interjay Jan 1 '13 at 10:32
    
I realize that, but how do I return it in the form of a usual pointer, like 0x00000000? –  Cornel Grobbelaar Jan 1 '13 at 10:36
    
Or even better, how would I be able to write the value of [edi+0C] at the address 00A3EB6C to another value in C++? I'm still pretty new to this. –  Cornel Grobbelaar Jan 1 '13 at 10:37
1  
To do that, you need to know when this "writing to my pointer" happens and have a way to run your own code at that point. That is what Microsoft Detours is for, though there are alternatives doing the same thing. Please read up on Detours and Code Injection in general, this is a very broad topic. –  DCoder Jan 1 '13 at 11:02
1  
Side Bar: The "Its in an external application" should be in the original post. Not something discovered 10 comments deep. Please do try to include critical info related to your question in the future. –  WhozCraig Jan 1 '13 at 11:05

1 Answer 1

So presumably, you have some function like this:

void func(...)
{
    asm {
      ... 

      mov [edi+0xc], eax
      ... 
    }
}

Now, to get that value of eax out of the function, you would need to pass in a pointer

void func(..., int *ptr)
{
    asm {
       ... 

       mov [edi+oxc], eax
       mov [ptr], eax
       ... 
    }
 }

or you can use it as a return value:

int func(...)
{
   int ret;

   asm {
       ... 

       mov [edi+oxc], eax
       mov [ret], eax
       ... 
    }

   return ret;
}

There are possibly other options too, but those are the easiest.

If you actually want to get a pointer to edi, you'd be using a pointer to pointer as the argument [or a pointer as return value - so I'll just show you the pointer to pointer, as the return value follows exactly the same pattern as above]

void func(..., int **ptr)
{
    asm {
       ... 

     // Assumes eax isn't used elsewhere below! 
     // Otherwise, find another free register. 
       mov [edi+oxc], eax
       lea [edi+0xc], eax      // LEA = load effective address. 
       mov [ptr], eax
       ... 
    }
 }
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The mov [edi+0xC], eax instruction lives in an external application, OP is reading that application's memory. –  DCoder Jan 1 '13 at 11:06
    
Well, then there's nothing that can be done without binary patching - sorry, I thought he was LEARNING assembler, not LEARNING how to hack - find some empty space and rearrange the code. –  Mats Petersson Jan 1 '13 at 11:08
1  
Ok, so write a debug module that stops at that address, fetches the register value for EDI and add 12. Simples - it's only a few dozen lines of code, I'd say. But your "need" sounds like you are more into hacking than programming. –  Mats Petersson Jan 1 '13 at 11:12
1  
It's not something I can do on my Linux machine (not in a way that is useful on a Windows system, and C# implies Windows). Have a look at these functions: msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/windows/desktop/… –  Mats Petersson Jan 1 '13 at 11:51
1  
Reading a registter is done by GetThreadContext: msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/windows/desktop/… I would suggest that you study the whole set of functions - I'm not going to tell you every function you need to use. –  Mats Petersson Jan 1 '13 at 12:04

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