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What is the equivalent of the backticks found in Ruby and Perl in Python? That is, in Ruby I can do this:

foo = `cat /tmp/baz`

What does the equivalent statement look like in Python? I've tried os.system("cat /tmp/baz") but that puts the result to standard out and returns to me the error code of that operation.

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I'd be careful ... I was downvoted the other day for using backticks in an answer to a Perl question. –  pavium Sep 11 '09 at 13:53
11  
Did they say why they downvoted you? Or what they don't like about backticks? IMO, backticks aren't any worse than the rest of Perl. –  Mnebuerquo Feb 10 '10 at 6:08
    
backticks are ugly; in perl they can be replaced with the qx operator, and in sh they can be replaced with $() –  William Pursell Sep 1 '11 at 13:11
    
4  
@WilliamPursell That may be your opinion, I find them pleasingly concise and one of the smallest yet most visibly distinct characters, not easily confused with single quotes. –  KomodoDave Apr 25 '13 at 7:02
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7 Answers 7

up vote 45 down vote accepted
output = os.popen('cat /tmp/baz').read()
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The most flexible way is to use the subprocess module:

import subprocess

proc = subprocess.Popen(["cat", "/tmp/baz"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
(out, err) = proc.communicate()
print "program output:", out

If you want to pass the call through the shell, for example to get file name expansion with *, you can use the shell=True parameter. If you do this, you have to provide the command as a string, quoted/... like you would type it in at a shell prompt:

proc = subprocess.Popen('cat /tmp/ba* "s p a c e.txt"', shell=True, ...)
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yes, this is the only sane way, you could wrap it in a function so you can call something like execute("command") –  Vinko Vrsalovic Sep 11 '09 at 13:54
    
This actually doesn't work for me, as in this case, baz is a directory and I'm trying to get the contents of all the files in that directory. (doing cat /tmp/baz/* works in ticks but not via the method described here) –  Chris Bunch Sep 11 '09 at 13:57
6  
re: "*" does not work; use subprocess.Popen(["cat", "/tmp/baz"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True) instead. Since glob (star) expansion is handled by shell, subprocessing module must use shell expansion in this case (provided by /bin/sh). –  Pasi Savolainen Sep 11 '09 at 14:03
    
+1, subprocess is the preferable way to do it. –  Nadia Alramli Sep 11 '09 at 14:46
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From docs.python.org/2/library/subprocess.html#popen-constructor : "(with shell=True) If args is a sequence, the first item specifies the command string, and any additional items will be treated as additional arguments to the shell itself." So, if you're going to use shell=True, then the first arg should probably be the string "cat /tmp/baz". Alternatively, if you want to use a sequence as the first arg then you should use shell=False –  onlynone Jan 11 '13 at 18:04
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sth is right. You can also use os.popen(), but where available (Python 2.4+) subprocess is generally preferable.

However, unlike some languages that encourage it, it's generally considered bad form to spawn a subprocess where you can do the same job inside the language. It's slower, less reliable and platform-dependent. Your example would be better off as:

foo= open('/tmp/baz').read()

eta:

baz is a directory and I'm trying to get the contents of all the files in that directory

? cat on a directory gets me an error.

If you want a list of files:

import os
foo= os.listdir('/tmp/baz')

If you want the contents of all files in a directory, something like:

contents= []
for leaf in os.listdir('/tmp/baz'):
    path= os.path.join('/tmp/baz', leaf)
    if os.path.isfile(path):
        contents.append(open(path, 'rb').read())
foo= ''.join(contents)

or, if you can be sure there are no directories in there, you could fit it in a one-liner:

path= '/tmp/baz'
foo= ''.join(open(os.path.join(path, child), 'rb').read() for child in os.listdir(path))
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Although this wasn't an answer to the question, it's the best answer for educating users. –  noamtm Feb 28 '10 at 14:28
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foo = subprocess.check_output(["cat", "/tmp/baz"])
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Best way to do it. :) –  Gandaro May 12 '12 at 13:01
    
This is the most straightforward way now. "subprocess.check_output" was added in Python 2.7, which was released in July 2010, after the other "popen" answers were given. –  Robert Fleming Apr 18 '13 at 19:27
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import os
foo = os.popen('cat /tmp/baz', 'r').read()
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This is the equivalent of Ruby's backticks, but if your problem is to list the contents of a directory then this is not the best way to do it. –  awatts Sep 11 '09 at 14:28
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If you use subprocess.Popen, remember to specify bufsize. The default is 0, which means "unbuffered", not "choose a reasonable default".

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I'm using

(6:0)$ python --version Python 2.7.1

One of the examples above is:

import subprocess
proc = subprocess.Popen(["cat", "/tmp/baz"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)
(out, err) = proc.communicate()
print "program output:", out

For me, this failed to access the directory /tmp. After looking at the doc string for subprocess I replaced

[ "prog", "arg"]

with

"prog arg"

and got the shell expansion behavior that was desired (a la Perl's `prog arg`)

print subprocess.Popen("ls -ld /tmp/v*", stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True).communicate()[0]


I quit using python a while back because I was annoyed with the difficulty of of doing the equivalent of perl `cmd ...`. I'm glad to find Python has made this reasonable.

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