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I'm writing a control application for the Logitech Media Server (formerly known as Squeezebox Server).

A small part of that is discovering which servers are running on the local network. This is done by broadcasting a special UDP package to port 3483 and waiting for replies. If no server replies after a given time, (or a preferred server replies) the application should stop listening.

I have it working in C#, using the async/await features of C# 5, but I was curious to see how it would look in F#. I have the following function (more or less directly translated from C#):

let broadCast (timeout:TimeSpan) onServerDiscovered = async {
  use udp = new UdpClient ( EnableBroadcast = true )
  let endPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Broadcast, 3483)
  let! _ = udp.SendAsync(discoveryPacket, discoveryPacket.Length, endPoint) 
           |> Async.AwaitTask

  let timeoutTask = Task.Delay(timeout)
  let finished = ref false
  while not !finished do
    let recvTask = udp.ReceiveAsync()
    let! _ = Task.WhenAny(timeoutTask, recvTask) |> Async.AwaitTask
    finished := if not recvTask.IsCompleted then true
                else let udpResult = recvTask.Result
                     let hostName = udpResult.RemoteEndPoint.Address.ToString()
                     let serverName = udpResult.Buffer |> getServerName 
                     onServerDiscovered serverName hostName 9090
  }

The discoveryPacket is a byte array containing the data to broadcast. getServerName is a function defined elsewhere, that extracts the human-readable server name from the server reply data.

So the application calls broadCast with two arguments, a timeout and a callback function that will be called when a server replies. This callback function can then decide to end listening or not, by return true or false. If no server replies, or no callback returns true, the function returns after the timeout expires.

This code works just fine, but I am vaguely bothered by the use of the imperative ref cell finished.

So here's the question: is there an idiomatic F#-y way to do this kind of thing without turning to the imperative dark side?

Update

Based on the accepted answer below (which was very nearly right), this is the full test program I ended up with:

open System
open System.Linq
open System.Text
open System.Net
open System.Net.Sockets
open System.Threading.Tasks

let discoveryPacket = 
    [| byte 'd'; 0uy; 2uy; 23uy; 0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 
       0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 1uy; 2uy; 3uy; 4uy; 5uy |]

let getUTF8String data start length =
    Encoding.UTF8.GetString(data, start, length)

let getServerName data =
    data |> Seq.skip 1 
         |> Seq.takeWhile ((<) 0uy)
         |> Seq.length
         |> getUTF8String data 1


let broadCast (timeout : TimeSpan) onServerDiscovered = async {
    use udp = new UdpClient (EnableBroadcast = true)
    let endPoint = IPEndPoint (IPAddress.Broadcast, 3483)
    do! udp.SendAsync (discoveryPacket, Array.length discoveryPacket, endPoint) 
        |> Async.AwaitTask
        |> Async.Ignore

    let timeoutTask = Task.Delay timeout

    let rec loop () = async {
        let recvTask = udp.ReceiveAsync()

        do! Task.WhenAny(timeoutTask, recvTask)
            |> Async.AwaitTask
            |> Async.Ignore

        if recvTask.IsCompleted then
            let udpResult = recvTask.Result
            let hostName = udpResult.RemoteEndPoint.Address.ToString()
            let serverName = getServerName udpResult.Buffer
            if onServerDiscovered serverName hostName 9090 then
                return ()      // bailout signalled from callback
            else
                return! loop() // we should keep listening
    }

    return! loop()
    }

[<EntryPoint>]
let main argv = 
    let serverDiscovered serverName hostName hostPort  = 
        printfn "%s @ %s : %d" serverName hostName hostPort
        false

    let timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5.0)
    broadCast timeout serverDiscovered |> Async.RunSynchronously
    printfn "Done listening"
    0 // return an integer exit code
share|improve this question
    
Why don't you write an infinite loop but run it using Async.RunSynchronously specifying a timeout of 5 seconds? –  Jon Harrop Jan 4 '13 at 0:51
    
@Jon Harrop - because in the real program (this is just a bare-bones example) I don't want to run the discovery synchronously. –  corvuscorax Jan 4 '13 at 8:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can implement this "functionally" with a recursive function which also produces an Async<'T> value (in this case, Async). This code should work -- it's based on the code you provided -- though I couldn't test it as it depends on other parts of your code.

open System
open System.Net
open System.Net.Sockets
open System.Threading.Tasks
open Microsoft.FSharp.Control

let broadCast (timeout : TimeSpan) onServerDiscovered = async {
    use udp = new UdpClient (EnableBroadcast = true)
    let endPoint = IPEndPoint (IPAddress.Broadcast, 3483)
    do! udp.SendAsync (discoveryPacket, Array.length discoveryPacket, endPoint) 
        |> Async.AwaitTask
        |> Async.Ignore

    let rec loop () =
      async {
      let timeoutTask = Task.Delay timeout
      let recvTask = udp.ReceiveAsync ()

      do! Task.WhenAny (timeoutTask, recvTask)
            |> Async.AwaitTask
            |> Async.Ignore

      if recvTask.IsCompleted then
          let udpResult = recvTask.Result
          let hostName = udpResult.RemoteEndPoint.Address.ToString()
          let serverName = getServerName udpResult.Buffer
          onServerDiscovered serverName hostName 9090
          return! loop ()
      }

    return! loop ()
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Since Tasks are started immediately when created, unlike async workflows, I suspect you should move the declaration of timeoutTask inside the loop async block. That way you get a new timeoutTask to go with each new recvTask. –  Joel Mueller Jan 1 '13 at 16:54
    
Thanks Joel, it's fixed now. –  Jack P. Jan 1 '13 at 17:27
    
Actually, having the timeoutTask outside the loop is what I'm after - in that way there is just one overall 5 second period (say) where I'm listening for servers, independent of when the replies come in. But Jacks code was almost right, I'll post the full solution in a minute, thanks. –  corvuscorax Jan 1 '13 at 18:44

I would sanitise the async calls and use an async timeout, more like this:

open System.Net

let discoveryPacket = 
  [|'d'B; 0uy; 2uy; 23uy; 0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 
     0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 0uy; 1uy; 2uy; 3uy; 4uy; 5uy|]

let getUTF8String data start length =
  System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(data, start, length)

let getServerName data =
  data
  |> Seq.skip 1 
  |> Seq.takeWhile ((<) 0uy)
  |> Seq.length
  |> getUTF8String data 1

type Sockets.UdpClient with
  member client.AsyncSend(bytes, length, ep) =
    let beginSend(f, o) = client.BeginSend(bytes, length, ep, f, o)
    Async.FromBeginEnd(beginSend, client.EndSend)

  member client.AsyncReceive() =
    async { let ep = ref null
            let endRecv res =
              client.EndReceive(res, ep)
            let! bytes = Async.FromBeginEnd(client.BeginReceive, endRecv)
            return bytes, !ep }

let broadCast onServerDiscovered =
  async { use udp = new Sockets.UdpClient (EnableBroadcast = true)
          let endPoint = IPEndPoint (IPAddress.Broadcast, 3483)
          let! _ = udp.AsyncSend(discoveryPacket, discoveryPacket.Length, endPoint)
          while true do
            let! bytes, ep = udp.AsyncReceive()
            let hostName = ep.Address.ToString()
            let serverName = getServerName bytes
            onServerDiscovered serverName hostName 9090 }

do
  let serverDiscovered serverName hostName hostPort  =
    printfn "%s @ %s : %d" serverName hostName hostPort

  let timeout = 5000
  try
    Async.RunSynchronously(broadCast serverDiscovered, timeout)
  with _ -> ()
  printfn "Done listening"

I'd also replace your side-effect-based serverDiscovered function with a different architecture, like an async agent that collects replies for 5s.

share|improve this answer

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