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I want to modify some system calls for tracing purposes. To be specific, whenever a system call open is made, I want to print some messages.

I have been looking into the internet and the code and I found open.c in kernel/goldfish/fs/ directory. And there are many functions in this file. How would I know which function is being called exactly. I could have written some printk call in all these functions to find it but I have to do it for other system calls also.

So, I have a few questions,

1) What is the best way to find implementation details of system calls?

2) I am using Kernel 2.6.29 (goldfish-Android). Are system calls implementation different in different kernel versions?

3) strace tells me that msgget ,msgrecv and 'SYS_24' system calls are being made. I look into Android/bionic/libc/SYSCALLS.txt file and msgget is not there.

But when I look into android/bionic/libc/kernel/arch-arm/asm/unistd.h file, I can find msgget there. I can't understand what's going on and then how can I find implementation for msgget ?

Thanks.

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StackOverflow is not a great resource for Android internals questions like these. StackOverflow is mostly used for questions related to building apps using the SDK. If you do not get an answer here, head over to source.android.com, choose an appropriate Google Group, and try asking there. –  CommonsWare Jan 1 '13 at 13:44
    
Most Linux systems (and Android is a Linux system at heart) can catch syscalls with ptrace. Did you investigate that route? –  Basile Starynkevitch Jan 1 '13 at 14:14
    
That would be what strace is doing. But it's possible the strace binary used has a bad table of syscall numbers (built for a different version). –  Chris Stratton Jan 1 '13 at 14:33
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msgget() and msgrecv() are System V IPC functions, and Android does not support System V IPC as the designers felt it had problems including denial of service potential. This strongly suggests that the strace you used does not have quite the right syscall table, however what strace is doing with ptraces is a good approach, so you might look into rebuilding it, or just grepping the output for functions of interest (hopefully ones that are correct in its table) –  Chris Stratton Jan 1 '13 at 14:50
    
Thanks for Googlegroup and ptrace suggestions and msgget() details. I was already in doubt with the output of strace. –  Junaid Jan 1 '13 at 15:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This link mentions almost all the system calls, their arguments and locations in respective files. It helped me finding system call details.

and answer for strace is given in above comments by Chris, thanks to him again.

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