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I want to transform a 2d numpy array into a polygon. Performance is very important for me, but I want to avoid making a C extension. A binary outline image can be made with erosion. Then I found this. It was too slow and didn't cope with the spikes created by erosion sometimes. A spike:

000100
000100
000100
111011

My first try:

mat = mat.copy() != 0
mat = mat - scipy.ndimage.binary_erosion(mat)

vertices = np.argwhere(mat)
minx = vertices.min(axis=0)[0]
maxx = vertices.max(axis=0)[0]

vertices_sorted = {}
for x in xrange(minx - 1, maxx + 2):
    vertices_sorted[x] = []

for vertex in vertices:
    vertices_sorted[vertex[0]].append(vertex[1])

vertex_loop = [(minx, vertices_sorted[minx][0])]
while True:
    x, y = vertex_loop[-1]
    for column, row in ((x, y + 1), (x, y - 1), 
    (x + 1, y), (x + 1, y + 1), (x + 1, y - 1),
    (x - 1, y), (x - 1, y + 1), (x - 1, y - 1)):
        if row in vertices_sorted[column]:
            vertices_sorted[column].remove(row)
            vertex_loop.append((column, row))
            break
    else:
        vertex_loop.pop()

    if vertex_loop[-1] == vertex_loop[0]:
        break
return vertex_loop[:-1]

It works most of the time, but it isn't fast enough. My second code works only rarely, but I havent fixed it, because it is multiple times slower than the first one:

mat = mat.copy() != 0
mat = mat - scipy.ndimage.binary_erosion(mat)

xs, ys = np.nonzero(mat)
ys = np.ma.array(ys)

vertex_loop = [(xs[0], ys[0])]
ys[0] = np.ma.masked
while True:
    x, y = vertex_loop[-1]
    start = np.searchsorted(xs, x-1, side="left")
    end = np.searchsorted(xs, x+1, side="right")

    for i in xrange(start, end):
        if ys[i] == y or ys[i] == y + 1 or ys[i] == y - 1:
            vertex_loop.append((xs[i], ys[i]))
            ys[i] = np.ma.masked
            break
    else:
        if np.all(ys.mask):
            break
        else:
            vertex_loop.pop()
return vertex_loop

How can I improve the speed further?

EDIT: It seems that numpy masked arrays are extremely slow. This implementation is almost exactly as fast as the first one:

#import time
#t1 = time.time()
mat = mat.copy() != 0
mat = mat - scipy.ndimage.binary_erosion(mat)

xs, ys = np.nonzero(mat)
#t2 = time.time()
minx = xs[0]
maxx = xs[-1]

# Ketju pakosti käy läpi kaikki rivit minx:n ja maxx:n välissä, sillä se ON KETJU
xlist = range(minx - 1, maxx + 2)
# starts ja ends ovat dictit jotka kertovat missä slicessä x == key
tmp = np.searchsorted(xs, xlist, side="left")
starts = dict(zip(xlist, tmp))
tmp = np.searchsorted(xs, xlist, side="right")
ends = dict(zip(xlist, tmp))

unused = np.ones(len(xs), dtype=np.bool)
#t3 = time.time()
vertex_loop = [(xs[0], ys[0])]
unused[0] = 0
count = 0
while True:
    count += 1
    x, y = vertex_loop[-1]
    for i in xrange(starts[x - 1], ends[x + 1]):
        row = ys[i]
        if unused[i] and (row == y or row == y + 1 or row == y - 1):
            vertex_loop.append((xs[i], row))
            unused[i] = 0
            break
    else:
        if abs(x - xs[0]) <= 1 and abs(y - ys[0]) <= 1:
            break
        else:
            vertex_loop.pop()
#t4 = time.time()
#print abs(t1-t2)*1000, abs(t2-t3)*1000, abs(t3-t4)*1000
return vertex_loop

I wonder if there is an easy way to do this with scipy that I've failed to stumble upon.

EDIT2: In pygame there is a mask object that does just what I need in 0.025 ms while my solution requires 35 ms and find_contours that I found on the internet somewhere does it in 4-5 ms. I'm going to modify the source code for pygame.mask.outline to use a numpy array and post it here.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here it is: an extremely fast way of getting the outline of a binary numpy array.

outline.py:

from scipy.weave import inline, converters

_code = open("outline.c", "r").read()

def outline(data, every):
    width, height = data.shape
    return inline(_code, ['data', 'width', 'height', 'every'], type_converters=converters.blitz)

outline.c:

/*
Modifioitu pygame.mask.Mask.outline
Input: data, width, height, every
*/

PyObject *plist, *value;
int x, y, e, firstx, firsty, secx, secy, currx, curry, nextx, nexty, n;
int a[14], b[14];
a[0] = a[1] = a[7] = a[8] = a[9] = b[1] = b[2] = b[3] = b[9] = b[10] = b[11]= 1;
a[2] = a[6] = a[10] = b[4] = b[0] = b[12] = b[8] = 0;
a[3] = a[4] = a[5] = a[11] = a[12] = a[13] = b[5] = b[6] = b[7] = b[13] = -1;

plist = NULL;
plist = PyList_New (0);
/*if (!plist) En ymmärrä mihin tätä tarvii
    return NULL;*/

every = 1;
n = firstx = firsty = secx = x = 0;

/*if(!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "|i", &every)) {
    return NULL;
}

 by copying to a new, larger mask, we avoid having to check if we are at
   a border pixel every time.  
bitmask_draw(m, c, 1, 1); */

e = every;

/* find the first set pixel in the mask */
for (y = 1; y < height-1; y++) {
    for (x = 1; x < width-1; x++) {
        if (data(x, y)) {
             firstx = x;
             firsty = y;
             value = Py_BuildValue("(ii)", x-1, y-1);
             PyList_Append(plist, value);
             Py_DECREF(value);
             break;
        }
    }
    if (data(x, y))
        break;
}



/* covers the mask having zero pixels or only the final pixel
Pikseleitä on ainakin kymmenen
if ((x == width-1) && (y == height-1)) {
    return plist;
}        */

/* check just the first pixel for neighbors */
for (n = 0;n < 8;n++) {
    if (data(x+a[n], y+b[n])) {
        currx = secx = x+a[n];
        curry = secy = y+b[n];
        e--;
        if (!e) {
            e = every;
            value = Py_BuildValue("(ii)", secx-1, secy-1);
            PyList_Append(plist, value);
            Py_DECREF(value);
        }
        break;
    }
}       

/* if there are no neighbors, return
Pikseleitä on ainakin kymmenen
if (!secx) {
    return plist;
}*/

/* the outline tracing loop */
for (;;) {
    /* look around the pixel, it has to have a neighbor */
    for (n = (n + 6) & 7;;n++) {
        if (data(currx+a[n], curry+b[n])) {
            nextx = currx+a[n];
            nexty = curry+b[n];
            e--;
            if (!e) {
                e = every;
                if ((curry == firsty && currx == firstx) && (secx == nextx && secy == nexty)) {
                    break;
                }
                value = Py_BuildValue("(ii)", nextx-1, nexty-1);
                PyList_Append(plist, value);
                Py_DECREF(value);
            }
            break;
        }
    }
    /* if we are back at the first pixel, and the next one will be the
       second one we visited, we are done */
    if ((curry == firsty && currx == firstx) && (secx == nextx && secy == nexty)) {
        break;
    }

    curry = nexty;
    currx = nextx;
}

return_val = plist;
share|improve this answer

"I want to transform a 2d numpy array into a polygon" - could you please clarify this? Do you mean that you want a labelled array of just the edge elements (on the original grid), or an ordered list of polygon vertex coordinates?

For example: does this

[ [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 1, 1, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 1, 1, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 1, 1, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ] ]

get transformed into this:

[ [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 1, 1, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 0, 1, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 1, 1, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ] ]

or into a list of vertexes ( (1, 1), (3,1), (3,3), (1,3) ) ?

Or do you want to first find the edges and then the vertexes?

I will answer briefly based on the assumption that what you want is just the edges (since you are talking about erosion, etc). It sounds like you are trying to do edge detection using morphological operations (erosion, etc). Edge detection can be done just as well directly. Use ndimage.sobel or scikits.filter.canny, or this:

import numpy as np
import scipy.ndimage as ndimage
import matplotlib.pyplot as pyplot
im = np.zeros((32, 32))
im[8:-8, 8:-8] = 1
im = ndimage.rotate(im, 15)
im = numpy.where(im > 0.5, 1, 0)
edges = (ndimage.filters.maximum_filter(im, size=2) == ndimage.filters.minimum_filter(im, size=2))
pyplot.imshow(edges, interpolation='nearest')
pyplot.show()

If your data is already thresholded (0 and 1) and the edges are not excessively noisy any edge detector would work great.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry for the lack of clarity in my question. I have a binary image of a polygon without holes and want to transform it into a polygon. The problem is ordering the edge pixels so they make a polygon. binary 2d numpy array --> list or array of coordinates –  Joonazan Jan 2 '13 at 11:33
    
@Joonazan: are your polygons convex? –  Alex I Jan 2 '13 at 12:36
    
That would simplify the problem, but unfortunately not. –  Joonazan Jan 2 '13 at 12:38

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