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I've frequently used strtotime("next time") to get the time to the next instance of a daily event, but what about shorter intervals?

Something happens every time the units digit of the minutes is 7 (00:07, 00:17, 00:27 and so on in 10-minute intervals)

So given the current time, how do I go about getting the time to the next one?

Currently the best I can come up with is strtotime(substr(date("Y-m-d H:i"),0,-1)."7"), but it seems kind of dirty and doesn't even work for times past xx:x7 and before xx:x0. Is there a better way?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seconding the usage of DateTime:

<?php
$dt = new DateTime('2013-01-01 16:54:11');
for($qq = 0; $qq < 10; ++$qq) { // loop to test all minute remainders
    $dt->modify('+1 minute +3seconds'); // seconds just for show
    $min = +$dt->format('i'); // current minutes
    $sec = +$dt->format('s'); // current seconds
    $r10 = $min % 10;
    // if it's hh:27 now, this will result in hh:37, change >= to > if that forwarding is not needed
    if($r10 >= 7) {
        $deltaMin = 17 - $r10;
    } else {
        $deltaMin = 7 - $r10;
    }
    // time left until next "good" point in time
    $change = sprintf('%+d minutes -%d seconds', $deltaMin, $sec);
    $new = clone($dt);
    $new->modify($change);
    printf("%s\t %s\n%s\n--\n", $dt->format('r'), $change, $new->format('r'));
}
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That's a LOT of code for something that I could simply do with the fix I found for my problem: (strtotime(substr(date("Y-m-d H:i",DATE),0,-1)."7")-DATE+600)%600 (where DATE is a constant holding the current time at the start of the script's execution) –  Niet the Dark Absol Jan 1 '13 at 16:14
    
@Kolink: fair enough, if you document exactly what that thing is doing. –  DCoder Jan 1 '13 at 16:15
    
Thanks for the answer anyway. I'm going to Accept it because it was well-written and it is a best practice as opposed to my one-line-hack. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jan 1 '13 at 16:30

You were nearly there:

$now = time() + (date('is')>5700?600:0);
$new = strtotime(substr(date("Y-m-d H:i", $now),0,-1)."7");
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An option is to use the DateTime::setTime() method, with a little bit of arithmetic.

$date = new DateTime('12:34', new DateTimeZone('Europe/Paris'));

$minute = ceil(($date->format('i') - 7 + 1) / 10) * 10 + 7;
$date->setTime($date->format('G'), $minute, 0);

echo $date->format('H:i'); // 12:37

An example of using it in a loop, for demonstration purposes:

$date = new DateTime('16:00', new DateTimeZone('Europe/Paris'));
$period = new DatePeriod($date, new DateInterval('PT1M'), 60);
foreach ($period as $date) {
    echo $date->format('H:i => ');

    $minute = ceil(($date->format('i') - 7 + 1) / 10) * 10 + 7;
    $date->setTime($date->format('G'), $minute, 0);

    echo $date->format('H:i'), PHP_EOL;
}

The above outputs something like:

16:00 => 16:07
16:01 => 16:07
16:02 => 16:07
16:03 => 16:07
16:04 => 16:07
16:05 => 16:07
16:06 => 16:07
16:07 => 16:17
16:08 => 16:17
16:09 => 16:17
16:10 => 16:17
... removed to save scrolling ...
16:50 => 16:57
16:51 => 16:57
16:52 => 16:57
16:53 => 16:57
16:54 => 16:57
16:55 => 16:57
16:56 => 16:57
16:57 => 17:07
16:58 => 17:07
16:59 => 17:07
17:00 => 17:07

» See this example running online

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