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I am trying to apply the principals of DDD in my current project. I'll try asking this (long-winded) question with an example that will hopefully make sense.

When creating a new Member, my presentation layer calls MemberService.CreateMember(MemberDTO memberDTO) that is defined in an Application Layer.

My Presentation Layer has something like this:

MemberDTO member = new MemberDTO(); //Defined in Application Layer

member.Username = username;
member.Password = password;
//...etc

My Application Layer calls the following Factory method in the Domain Layer to create the member:

public static Member MemberFactory.CreateMember(string memberDTO.Username, string memberDTO.Password...)
{
  var member = new Member(); //Domain.Model.Member

  member.Id = GenerateIdentity();

  member.Username = memberDTO.Username;

  //... etc

  return member;
}

the Member is passed back to the MemberService (Application Layer) which saves it (Repository in Infrastructure Layer) and maps it MemberDTO (using AutoMapper) and passes it back to the Presentation Layer.

So, my Presentation Layer is setting values in the MemberDTO and then my Domain Layer (via Factory) is taking individual parameters and setting the values for the Member. Without the Factory it would be simple but I am generating the Id here. Would it be wrong to create a Domain Service instead to generate the Id? For example, change the the MemberService.CreateMember(MemberDTO memberDTO) method from:

public MemberDTO CreateMember(MemberDTO memberDTO)
{
   var member = MemberFactory.CreateMember(memberDTO.Username, memberDTO.Password); 
   //Domain.Model.Member

   SaveMember(member);

   //Pass DTO to presentation layer
   return Mapper.Map<Member, MemberDTO>(member);
}

To this:

public MemberDTO CreateMember(MemberDTO memberDTO)
{
   var member = new Member(); //Domain.Model.Member

   Mapper.Map<MemberDTO, Member>(memberDTO);

   //Add this method into a Domain Service to generate the ID and any other defaults
   Domain.MemberService.Initialise(member);

   SaveMember(member);

   //Pass DTO to presentation layer
   return Mapper.Map<Member, MemberDTO>(member);
}

Sorry for the long-winded question even though the answer could be a simple yes or no!

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3 Answers 3

I'm not sure about this question in relationship to DDD because I don't see a complex domain that needs the extra complexity. However, There probably is an argument to have the generation of the identity defined in another structure, but this is mostly to achieve single responsibility (SRP).

I suggest that you create an interface named IGenerateMemberIdentity. Then, you can isolate that complexity and test it. I think your intuition that this functionality does not belong in a factory is correct. If this is a complex routine, it doesn't seem to be about object creation.

However, for me, Initialize static methods seem like a code smell. Better to inject a dependency behind an interface that will provide that functionality.

To specifically answer your question. No, I don't think it is wrong. In fact, modeling complexity in order to preserve pure business functionality is what DDD is best at.

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Thanks @dtryon , I simplified the domain for the example. The only thing is that in the 'To this:' part I'm no longer using a Factory to create an instance of the Member. That's why I thought something like an Initialise method to also set defaults ie. Member.IsVerified = false; or should I just set these in the constructor for Member? –  Alan Marsh Jan 1 '13 at 23:36
    
If Member.IsVerified is a bool, it will be set to false by default. If you have more complex creation I would look at patterns like Builder. However, I would recommend that you separate concerns related to configuration, defaults, and identity generation. These all seem like separate concerns when dealing with members. –  Davin Tryon Jan 2 '13 at 12:34
    
Thanks, as I said to Aaron, the MemberFactory in this case is then just an overhead as I'm passing in individual parameters from the DTO into the factory and manually mapping these parameters to the domain model. –  Alan Marsh Jan 2 '13 at 21:40

In relation to DDD, if this identity is not a domain identity (ie. what defines a User based on the Bounded Context), then it does not belong in your domain model. In most cases I have seen, the user name is the identity for the user in the bounded context and any generated ID will be done for the sake of database access. I suspect that this may be your case and, if I'm right, then the generated ID is an infrastructure concern and should be done by your repository implementation. Your domain should not have any concept of this generated ID.

On the other hand, let's say that user name is the identity for the user in your context and you wanted to generate that identity using some domain formula. In this case, generating the identity would be a domain service method because it doesn't really belong to an instance of any of your domain objects. The generated ID would then be passed into your factory and you would have:

public MemberDTO CreateMember(MemberDTO memberDTO)
{
   //Domain.Model.Member
   var member = MemberFactory.CreateMember(MemberService.GenerateUserName(), memberDTO.Password); 

   SaveMember(member); //Repository method?

   //Pass DTO to presentation layer
   return Mapper.Map<Member, MemberDTO>(member);
}

To summarize, the answer is no, it would not be wrong to create a domain service to generate the ID assuming the ID is the actual identity for the bounded context. In fact, this is what you should do. However, if the ID is not the identity of the user for the bounded context, then let your repository worry about how to generate IDs, access the db, and transform to/from your domain model.

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Thanks @Aaron, that makes sense, I'm just thinking the MemberFactory is then just an overhead as I'm passing in individual parameters from the DTO into the factory and manually coding mapping these parameters to the domain model. –  Alan Marsh Jan 2 '13 at 21:37
    
For the purposes of generating an ID, I agree with you. However, you should keep the MemberFactory for the purpose of encapsulation. Regardless of how complex the code is for constructing a Member, it allows you to make the member constructor private so that the MemberFactory must be used to get an instance of Member. This allows you to validate the inputs and potentially run other checks (ie. password rules) before allowing an instance of Member to be created. –  Aaron Hawkins Jan 2 '13 at 22:46
    
Valid points, in this particular factory I'm passing 12 parameters and that's without ones that I can set default values for so I considered passing in an interface to the DTO instead but I don't think that's allowed? –  Alan Marsh Jan 3 '13 at 23:03
    
What is or isn't allowed is determined by you, just realize that every choice has a consequence. That being said, if you're following Onion architecture and want your domain to be independent, then DTOs should not be referenced by your domain objects because they should be in an infrastructure project and the reference should be reversed (ie. your DTO project references your domain). Also, application services should be the ones doing the transformation from domain aggregate to DTO (which should also be in an infrastructure project). –  Aaron Hawkins Jan 3 '13 at 23:13

The short answer: Yes, you can pass DTO objects to a factory.

The long answer: A domain object factory is responsible for creating fully initialised domain objects. However you are free to choose any form of input as long as you can provide required information. In this case, it is a matter of personal choice to have either methods in your factory: - public Member CreateMember(string userName, string password, ...) {...} - public Member CreateMember(MemberDTO memberDTO) {...}

From layering point of view, a domain object factory is a part of the domain model. Hence it may be used and depended by different objects in the domain model layer and the application layer. From what you described, the MemberService seems belong to your application (service) layer. You may find difficult dependency problems if you move the creation logic into it. For example, if a Booking domain object creates a Member domain object when it is confirmed, you could end up having the Booking object depends on the MemberService, which is not a good idea. The example is illustrated here: http://thinkinginobjects.com/2012/09/05/abstract-factory-in-domain-modelling

If we step back a bit and look at the problem with some perspective, I would like to ask what exactly the MemberDTO and MemberService serve your application. Is the DTO object used as a wrapper of a set of data fields? Is the MemberService simply delegating the create call to your factory and repository? If the answers are yes, it would be much simpler code if we get rid of the MemberDTO and MemberService all together and leave the presentation to call the MemberFactory and MemberRepository directly. I am making a lot of assumption here however, you may find the DTO and Service still desirable if your presentation layer and service layer are physically separated.

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Thanks for your response @nwang0. The project is an enterprise level application and so I wanted to keep the MemberService (and services for the other aggregates). You mentioned public Member CreateMember(MemberDTO memberDTO) {...} but as the DTO is defined in the Application layer wouldn't it be wrong to have a reference to it in the Domain Layer? (as that is where the factory is) –  Alan Marsh Jan 3 '13 at 19:11

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