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Is it possible to instantiate a private inner class from another class using Java reflection. For example if I took this code

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {}
}

class OtherClass {
    private class Test {}
}

is it possible to instantiate and gain access to Test from the main method in the class main.

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1  
velocityreviews.com/forums/… –  Doorknob 冰 Jan 1 '13 at 16:42
    
To created a nested class, you must have an instance of an outer class. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 1 '13 at 17:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When using reflection, you'll find constructors of that inner class taking an instance of the outer class as an additional argument (always the first) .

See these questions for related information:

Example:

import java.lang.reflect.Constructor;
import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;

public class OuterClass {

    private class InnerClass {

    }

    public OuterClass() {
        super();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // instantiate outer class
        OuterClass outer = new OuterClass();

        // List all available constructors.
        // We must use the method getDeclaredConstructors() instead
        // of getConstructors() to get also private constructors.
        for (Constructor<?> ctor : OuterClass.InnerClass.class
                .getDeclaredConstructors()) {
            System.out.println(ctor);
        }

        try {
            // Try to get the constructor with the expected signature.
            Constructor<InnerClass> ctor = OuterClass.InnerClass.class
                    .getDeclaredConstructor(OuterClass.class);
            // This forces the security manager to allow a call
            ctor.setAccessible(true);

            // the call
            try {
                OuterClass.InnerClass inner = ctor.newInstance(outer);
                System.out.println(inner);
            } catch (InstantiationException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (SecurityException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}
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Yes, you can instantiate a private inner class with Java reflection. To do that, you need to have an instance of outer class and invoke the inner class constructor which will use outer class instance in its first argument.

Here is a code sample

class OuterClass {
    private class InnerClass {
        {
            //this block is just to confirm that the inner object was created
            //it will be added to every constructor of this class
            System.out.println("inner object created");
        }
    }
}

class Main {

    //no comment version
    public static Object giveMeInnerInstance() throws Exception{
        OuterClass outerObject = new OuterClass();
        Class<?> innerClass = OuterClass.class.getDeclaredClasses()[0];
        Constructor<?> constructor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructors()[0];
        constructor.setAccessible(true);
        return constructor.newInstance(outerObject);
    }

    //commented version
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        //we need an outer class object to use the inner object constructor
        //(the inner class object needs to know about its parent object)
        OuterClass outerObject = new OuterClass();

        //let's get the inner class 
        //(we know that the outer class has only one inner class, so we can use index 0)
        Class<?> innerClass = OuterClass.class.getDeclaredClasses()[0];
        //or if we know name of inner class we can use 
        //Class<?> innerClass = Class.forName("full.package.name.OuterClass$InnerClass")

        //since constructor so we could use it to pass instance of outer class and change 
        //its accessibility. We can use this code to get default constructor of InnerClass 
        //since we know that this is the only constructor here
        Constructor<?> constructor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructors()[0];
        //we could also use 
        //Constructor<?> constructor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructor(OuterClass.class);

        //the default constructor of the private class has same visibility that class has
        //so it is also private, so to be able to use it we need to make it accessible
        constructor.setAccessible(true);

        //now we are ready to create inner class instance
        Object innerObject = constructor.newInstance(outerObject);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i am sorry to reply so late but what i need to do is return a class object of the class by getting the classes fully qualified name without having an instance of the outer class –  popgalop Jan 5 '13 at 15:13
    
@popgalop Inner classes are the same as methods. Just like you can't invoke method without object, you can't create object of inner class without object of outer class. Only exception of this rule are nested classes (just like static methods). But I suppose you can't make your inner class nested (by adding static modifier). –  Pshemo Jan 5 '13 at 16:22
    
@popgalop Maybe if you tell us more about your problem we can find some better solution. –  Pshemo Jan 5 '13 at 16:30
    
i am trying to write a method that will return a class with the paramater of a fully qualified name, and the class the the method returns can be any kinf of class(inner, nested) not including anonymous inner classes –  popgalop Jan 5 '13 at 17:07
    
@popgalop Do you mean "return instance of class with the parameter of a fully qualified name"? –  Pshemo Jan 5 '13 at 17:24

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