Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I create an array where every entry is the same value--I know numpy.ones() and numpy.zeros() do this for 1's and 0's, but what about -1 for example:

>>import numpy as np
>>np.zeros((3,3))
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.]])

>>np.ones((2,5))
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.]])

>>np.negative_ones((2,5))
???
share|improve this question
    
now my idiocy is stored for posterity. excellent :) –  maxm Jan 1 '13 at 17:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I don't know if there's a nice one-liner without an arithmetic operation, but probably the fastest approach is to create an uninitialized array using empty and then use .fill() to set the values. For comparison:

>>> timeit m = np.zeros((3,3)); m += -1
100000 loops, best of 3: 6.9 us per loop
>>> timeit m = np.ones((3,3)); m *= -1
100000 loops, best of 3: 9.49 us per loop
>>> timeit m = np.zeros((3,3)); m.fill(-1)
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.31 us per loop
>>> timeit m = np.empty((3,3)); m[:] = -1
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.18 us per loop

>>> timeit m = np.empty((3,3)); m.fill(-1)
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.09 us per loop

but to be honest, I tend to either add to the zero matrix or multiply the ones matrix instead, as initialization is seldom a bottleneck.

share|improve this answer
    
100000 loops, best of 3: 9.49 us per loop Why does this take so long ? –  AsheeshR Jan 1 '13 at 17:06
1  
@Ashrj, 1. these timeings are unfortunatly not that representative, becuase the arrays is just too small, overhead for function calls plays a role (probably why its somewhat slower). 2. Actually these timings slightly change over versions, but I think using slicing (I also like [...]) or .fill are both great (and also win here). plus: readibility counts... –  seberg Jan 1 '13 at 18:12
    
Well, ones is basically empty + fill with some error catching, so the only place that any performance difference could show up is in small array sizes, because asymptotically they do exactly the same thing. –  DSM Jan 1 '13 at 18:32

-1 * np.ones((2,5))

Multplying by the number you need in the matrix will do the trick.

In [5]: -1 * np.ones((2,5))
Out[5]: 
array([[-1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
       [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1.]])

In [6]: 5 * np.ones((2,5))                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Out[6]:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
array([[ 5.,  5.,  5.,  5.,  5.],                                                                                                                                                                                                            
       [ 5.,  5.,  5.,  5.,  5.]]) 
share|improve this answer

For an array of -1s

-1 * np.ones((2,5))

Simply multiply with the constant.

share|improve this answer
foo = np.repeat(10, 50).reshape((5,10))

Will create a 5x10 matrix of 10s.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.