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Consider this code:

class GameEventsManager
{
    public void StartGameEvent(GameEvent TheGameEvent)
    {       
        SubscribeToGameEvent(TheGameEvent);
        TheGameEvent.Begin();
        UnsubscribeToGameEvent(TheGameEvent);
    }

    private void SubscribeToGameEvent(GameEvent TheGameEvent)
    {
        TheGameEvent.OnPlaySound += OnPlaySound;
        TheGameEvent.OnShowWrittenItem += OnShowWrittenItem;
            ...
    }

    private void UnsubscribeToGameEvent(GameEvent TheGameEvent)
    {
        TheGameEvent.OnPlaySound -= OnPlaySound;
        TheGameEvent.OnShowWrittenItem -= OnShowWrittenItem;
            ...
    }
}

A GameEvent is a class that basically does this: when Begin() gets called, it raises events that get passed to the GameEventManager, so that it may "make" the appropriate changes to the game environment (this is by further propagating the events to the objects that are responsible for executing each particular instruction, like in the Observer pattern).

Now take into consideration that all of my InventoryItems (can trigger events, such as OnConsume, OnUse) are static fields in their particular classes. Although this may seem a bit rough around the edges, I feel that being able to do:

AddItem(WrittenItems.NoteFromKing) //NoteFromKing is a static field in WrittenItems

makes things a lot simpler, and it's a welcome sight considering I'm working on a quite complex game.

This, however, makes it very hard for me to list ALL of the game's items somewhere, in case this would be needed. Which brings us to my question:

A LevelManager, that manages things such as when the player interacts with a particular item in the level, tells the GameEventsManager to run a particular GameEvent, if required. The GameEventsManager then subscribes to the GameEvent, starts it, and then unsubscribes. Should I expect to see noticeable performance issues while following this subscribe/run/unsubscribe pattern? In the end, the manager might subscribe/unsubscribe to about 20 events inside GameEvent.

In case the subscribe/unsubscribe mechanism is slow, I could make a single subscribe process that runs at game initialization, but that would force me to build an extra structure, to list all of the items.

So, in short, I'd like to know if I should be expecting considerable slowdowns from this kind of implementation. Or more exactly, if subscribing to about 20 events, and then unsubscribing from them is considerably slow.

Language is C#, using .NET 2.0 subset under Unity 4.

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How many times does subscribe/unsubscribe occur in a time period? It should not be a hit. Why not use items as constants and have them registered into single (static?) array? –  Algirdas Jan 1 '13 at 17:09
    
A subscribe/unsubscribe quite rarely; it actually depends a lot of what the player does, but it's not a frame-by-frame thing. I previously used a Dictionary<ItemID, InventoryItem> to store items. The thing that I had to add info about each item in two different places felt a bit wrong. –  Alex M. Jan 1 '13 at 17:18
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This, however, makes it very hard for me to list ALL of the game's items somewhere

Why so? You could create an ItemManager (which is a singleton):

public class ItemManager
{
    private static volatile ItemManager _instance;
    private static object syncRoot = new Object();

    private ObservableCollection<ItemBase> _registeredItems = new ObservableCollection<ItemBase>();
    private ItemManager()
    {
    }

    public ItemManager Instance
    {
        get
        {
             if (instance == null) 
             {
                 lock (syncRoot) 
                 {
                     if (instance == null) 
                         instance = new ItemManager();
                 }
             } 
             return instance;
        }
    }

    public void RegisterItem(ItemBase item)
    {
        _registeredItems.Add(item);
        // Do some stuff here, subscribe events, etc.
    }

    public void UnregisterItem(item)
    {
        // Do some stuff here, unregister events, etc.
        _registeredItems.Remove(item)
    }

}

Afterwards you make all item classes derive from a class called "ItemBase". And in ItemBases Constructor you call this:

ItemManager.Instance.RegisterItem(this);

So you don't have to add every single item manually. For more information about the singleton pattern, take a look here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff650316.aspx.

A little benefit of this is also, that you can implement a general communication between the GameManager and the ItemManager.

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I've read so much about how people hate singletons and singleton patterns that I didn't even think about such a solution. Let's see if I can elegantly do something about it. –  Alex M. Jan 1 '13 at 17:20
1  
Technically, the way I see it, a simple static class such as InventoryItems with a Collection<InventoryItem> that's also public and static, could work too. InventoryItems.AddItem(this) inside the constructor. –  Alex M. Jan 1 '13 at 17:23
    
That's correct. There are many ways to do it. –  Marco Klein Jan 1 '13 at 17:31
    
In order to avoid singletons' global state I just chose a simpler solution, that's more alike to how other Unity components are built. This way it's cleaner and simpler. –  Alex M. Jan 1 '13 at 21:29
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