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This question seems mind-boggling simple, yet I can't figure it out. I know you can check datatypes in python, but how can you set a conditional based on the datatype? For instance, if I have to write a code that sorts through a dictionary/list and adds up all the integers, how do I isolate the search to look for only integers?

I guess a quick example would look something like this:

y = []
for x in somelist:
    if type(x) == <type 'int'>:  ### <--- psuedo-code line
    y.append(x)
print sum(int(z) for z in y)

So for line 3, how would I set such a conditional?

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why does your list have integer and non-integer elements in it? What's that about? –  IfLoop Jan 1 '13 at 19:03
    
@TokenMacGuy - there is nothing that requires all elements in a list to be the same type. –  Paul McGuire Jan 1 '13 at 20:23
    
@Paul McGuire: no, the language certainly doesn't enforce any particular feature on the members of a particular list, but on the other hand, mixing and matching types together into a common collection suggests maybe those objects aren't as closely related as putting them into the same list structure would suggest. Could there be a better way to group those related elements than a single list? –  IfLoop Jan 1 '13 at 21:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

How about,

if isinstance(x, int):

but a cleaner way would simply be

sum(z for z in y if isinstance(z, int))
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1  
for further reading: Differences between isinstance() and type() in python –  moooeeeep Jan 1 '13 at 18:51
    
Yes, very good approach to what he wants to do. However, might be worthwhile pointing out the answer to his question is if type(x) == int but why that's a bad idea. –  Ben Hoyt Jan 1 '13 at 22:18

You can use the type function on both sides of the operator. Like this:

if type(x) == type(1):
share|improve this answer
    
No! This is a really bad idea for example type(u"testing") == type("testing") even though they are both strings. –  Jakob Bowyer Jan 1 '13 at 20:46

Easy - use types.

import types
k = 5
if(type(k)==types.IntType):
   print "int"

Here's a quick dir(types):

['BooleanType', 'BufferType', 'BuiltinFunctionType', 'BuiltinMethodType', 'ClassType', 'CodeType', 'ComplexType', 'DictProxyType', 'DictType', 'DictionaryType', 'EllipsisType', 'FileType', 'FloatType', 'FrameType', 'FunctionType', 'GeneratorType', 'GetSetDescriptorType', 'InstanceType', 'IntType', 'LambdaType', 'ListType', 'LongType', 'MemberDescriptorType', 'MethodType', 'ModuleType', 'NoneType', 'NotImplementedType', 'ObjectType', 'SliceType', 'StringType', 'StringTypes', 'TracebackType', 'TupleType', 'TypeType', 'UnboundMethodType', 'UnicodeType', 'XRangeType', '__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__']
share|improve this answer
    
No! This is a really bad idea for example type(u"testing") == type("testing") even though they are both strings. –  Jakob Bowyer Jan 1 '13 at 20:45
    
Whoa - can you explain why that is? I'm a little confused as to your logic. This isn't a production piece of code, merely an example of how to use a library. –  jimf Jan 1 '13 at 20:47
    
Comparing types won't handle subclasses, or even instances of custom classes or as the example shows, unicode vs string types, also it over complicates the situation –  Jakob Bowyer Jan 1 '13 at 20:48
    
Also, pretend all code is production code. –  Jakob Bowyer Jan 1 '13 at 20:49
2  
@JakobBowyer: type(u"") != type(""). You should check before you make claims like this. –  Ned Batchelder Jan 1 '13 at 21:13

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