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I'm trying to design an undo/redo mechanism to my Chess game.. I decided to use stack data structure which is going to build on an ArrayList.. I also want that my UndoStack and RedoStack classes should be singleton.. However i'm getting

method does not override or implement a method from a supertype

pop() in UndoStack cannot implement pop() in IStackable
  return type Move is not compatible with cgas5.Move
  where Move is a type-variable:
    Move extends Object declared in class UndoStack

error..

Here is my IStackable interface:

package cgas5;


public interface IStackable {

    abstract public Move pop();

    abstract public void push(Move m);

}

and my UndoStack class

package cgas5;

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class UndoStack<Move> extends ArrayList<Move> implements IStackable {

    UndoStack undoStack;

    private UndoStack() {
        undoStack = new UndoStack();
    }

    public UndoStack getUndoStack() {
        if (undoStack == null) {
            undoStack = new UndoStack();
        }
        return undoStack;
    }

    @Override
    public Move pop() {
        Move m = get(size() - 1);
        remove(size() - 1);
        return m;

    }

    @Override
    public void push(Move m) {
        add(m);
    }
}

and if it's necessary my Move class:

package cgas5;

public class Move {
    private Piece pieceToMove;
    private Square currentSquare;
    private Square targetSquare;
    private Piece capturedPiece;
    private Piece promotedPiece;

    public Move(){

    } 

    public Move(Piece pieceToMove, Square currentSquare, Square targetSquare){
        this.pieceToMove = pieceToMove;
        this.currentSquare = currentSquare;
        this.targetSquare = targetSquare;
    }

    public Piece getPieceToMove() {
        return pieceToMove;
    }

    public void setPieceToMove(Piece pieceToMove) {
        this.pieceToMove = pieceToMove;
    }

    public Square getCurrentSquare() {
        return currentSquare;
    }

    public void setCurrentSquare(Square currentSquare) {
        this.currentSquare = currentSquare;
    }

    public Square getTargetSquare() {
        return targetSquare;
    }

    public void setTargetSquare(Square targetSquare) {
        this.targetSquare = targetSquare;
    }

    public Piece getCapturedPiece() {
        return capturedPiece;
    }

    public void setCapturedPiece(Piece capturedPiece) {
        this.capturedPiece = capturedPiece;
    }

    public Piece getPromotedPiece() {
        return promotedPiece;
    }

    public void setPromotedPiece(Piece promotedPiece) {
        this.promotedPiece = promotedPiece;
    }

}

Thanks in advance..

share|improve this question
    
I don't think this makes sense: public class UndoStack<Move> –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 1 '13 at 18:59
    
@OliCharlesworth: It makes sense as far as the compiler is concerned, but it's not what the OP wants... –  Jon Skeet Jan 1 '13 at 19:00
    
In interface method declarations, you can omit both "abstract" and "public" –  fge Jan 1 '13 at 19:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is the problem:

public class UndoStack<Move> extends ArrayList<Move> 

That's using Move as a generic type parameter, whereas really you don't want a generic type at all - you just want to use Move as the type argument for ArrayList<E>. You want:

public class UndoStack extends ArrayList<Move> 

That should fix the problem - although personally I'd strongly recommend using composition instead of inheritance here. (In other words, make your UndoStack type contain an ArrayList<Move> - or something similar - rather than subclassing it.)

Additionally, this is never going to work:

UndoStack undoStack;

private UndoStack() {
    undoStack = new UndoStack();
}

That means that to create an UndoStack, you need to create another UndoStack... how do you expect that to happen? You'll currently get a stack overflow exception... why do you need the variable at all?

share|improve this answer
    
You're right about constructore mistake. Thank you. –  DonkeyKong Jan 1 '13 at 19:21

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