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i build an application how take Pcap file (wireshark file) and play the packets, the play operation is with exe file who get file path and interface int.

private void btnStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    shouldContinue = true;
    btnStart.Enabled = false;
    btnStop.Enabled = true;
    groupBoxAdapter.Enabled = false;
    groupBoxRootDirectory.Enabled = false;
    string filePath = string.Empty;

    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < lvFiles.Items.Count && shouldContinue; i++)
        {
            this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate { filePath = lvFiles.Items[i].Tag.ToString(); });
            pcapFile = new PcapFile();
            pcapFile.sendQueue(filePath, adapter);
        }

        this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate
        {
            btnStart.Enabled = true;
            btnStop.Enabled = false;
            groupBoxAdapter.Enabled = true;
            groupBoxRootDirectory.Enabled = true;
        });
    });
}

the sendQueue code:

public void sendQueue(string filePath, int deviceNumber)
        {
            ProcessStartInfo processStartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo(@"D:\Downloads\SendQueue\sendQueue.exe");
            processStartInfo.Arguments = string.Format("{0} {2}{1}{2}", (deviceNumber).ToString(), filePath, "\"");
            processStartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
            processStartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
            processStartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
            processStartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
            processStartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            processStartInfo.ErrorDialog = false;

            using (Process process = Process.Start(processStartInfo))
            {
                process.WaitForExit();
            }
        }
share|improve this question
1  
If you need these to run serially, why run them in background threads at all? If you need your UI to be responsive, why not run a loop inside the background thread? – Oded Jan 1 '13 at 19:23
    
can i have an example how to do it ? – user1269592 Jan 1 '13 at 19:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Doen't look that you need Background worker.

     List<string> tags = new List<string>();
     foreach (object item in lvFiles.Items)
     {
        tags.Add(item.tag.ToString());
     }

     ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
     {
       for (int i = 0; i < tags.Count && shouldContinue; i++)
       {
           sendQueue(tags[i], adapter);
       }

        //...
     }
share|improve this answer
    
my GUI still freeze – user1269592 Jan 1 '13 at 19:33
    
@user1269592 this is impossible, write how you used it – VladL Jan 1 '13 at 19:34
    
see my update... – user1269592 Jan 1 '13 at 19:36
    
@user1269592 take all invokes away and just call sendQueue directly inside of for loop – VladL Jan 1 '13 at 19:46
    
if i am just call sendQueue without the this.Invoke... cross threading error received – user1269592 Jan 1 '13 at 19:49

Your UI thread is most likely blocked because the pcapFile.sendQueue is synchronous. This means even though your async loop queues the play files the UI thread is busy 99.99% of the time playing the file's content. This may or may not be the case since you haven't posted PcapFile's source.

The task to make your UI responsive is a bit more involving, you need to restructure PcapFile to load up a frame (audio? video?) at a time and let the UI thread run the rest of the time or even to work completely in the background.

The form design should also rely on events from PcapFile instead of trying to run it in a BackgroundWorker

share|improve this answer
    
SendQueue code added – user1269592 Jan 1 '13 at 19:38
    
see my update, now it's working well but this is a correct way to do it ? – user1269592 Jan 1 '13 at 20:23
    
Instead of WaitForExit you can hook to the event Exited on Process. You will have to make sure you unhook from the event right after you receive it to prevent memory leaks – Sten Petrov Jan 2 '13 at 0:17

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