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I have a struct with some properties:

struct a {
    char* id;
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
}

I also have a struct with the same properties, but without the id.

struct b {
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
}

I know that C11 supports anonymous structs, so I could do something like this:

struct a {
    char* id;
    struct {
        int a;
        int b;
        int c;
    }
}

However, if I give the inner struct a tag, it fails. Is it possible to create nested structs like this without using a non-standard compiler option like -fms-extensions?

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Until C11 becomes commonplace, then no, you'll always be reliant on compiler-specific extensions. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 1 '13 at 19:32
    
Compiler options are not standard whichever way you do it, I'd use the flags it takes to make the compiler implement C11 correctly. –  u0b34a0f6ae Feb 6 '13 at 18:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can give the inner structure a name or a tag or both in C11 (i.e., without the use of any extension).

Without a tag and without a name, your inner structure is a C11 anonymous structure:

struct a {
    char* id;
    struct {
        int a;
        int b;
        int c;
    };
 };

If you give the inner anonymous structure a name, it is no longer an anonymous structure. It is a regular C89/C99/C11 structure member and you cannot access the inner structure members directly as with anonymous structures.

If you give the inner anonymous structure a tag (but still no name), it is just a C89/C99/C11 structure declaration. There is no member added and the declaration of struct a is the same as:

struct a {
    char* id;
};
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Really? Because if I do struct a { struct b { int a; }; }; and then do a.a, I get an error that struct a has no member named 'a'. Is this a compiler support problem? Or is it not allowed in C11? –  Alexis King Jan 1 '13 at 19:36
    
@JakeKing see my edit, it is no longer an anonymous structure so it is not allowed. –  ouah Jan 1 '13 at 19:38
1  
@JakeKing in the C definition an anonymous structure is an inner structure with no tag and no name. –  ouah Jan 1 '13 at 19:40
    
Ah, alright, got it. I'm a little confused as to why that isn't supported, but I realize that isn't within the scope of this question. However, I don't really want to have to refer to the inner struct's members indirectly, so I'd still rather duplicate the members anyway. I guess there's no way around it, then? –  Alexis King Jan 1 '13 at 19:41
    
Not portably to my knowledge. But if you don't want anyway to access the inner struct members indirectly, why the need to name the struct? –  ouah Jan 1 '13 at 19:44

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