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I have a test class like so:

public class CompareObjects {

public static class Obj {
    public int i;

    public Obj(int i) {
        this.i = i;
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Obj o1 = new Obj(0);
    Obj o2 = new Obj(0);

    if(o1 == o2) {
        System.out.println("Equal");
    }else{
        System.out.println("Not equal");
    }
}

}

I though the test would return "Equal", but it didn't. Why doesn't Java consider two objects with equal components not the same? Am I doing something wrong here? I have a feeling I completely overlooked something when I started learning Java.

Also, I tested the two against each other with the equals() method, and I get the same result. My reason for this question is that I would like to be able to test an ArrayList with the contains() method to see if one object has the same components as another and therefore equal. Any ideas?

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2  
one of the most basic things in java is the difference between equals and == –  gefei Jan 1 '13 at 20:49
1  
Implement your own "equals". == checks to see if they're the same objects, which in this case has nothing to do with their properties. –  Dave Newton Jan 1 '13 at 20:50
    
@gefei: Yes I know that. They both return "Not equal" though –  MrDoctorProfessorTyler Jan 1 '13 at 20:50
    
    
@JBNizet: What benefit do you get for responding like that? –  MrDoctorProfessorTyler Jan 1 '13 at 20:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

== compares the references to the object. For example:

Obj a = new Obj(0);
Obj b = a;
//a == b

Try implementing equals():

public static class Obj {
    public int i;

    public Obj(int i) {
        this.i = i;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object other) {
        if (other == this) return true;
        if (!(other instanceof Obj) || other == null) return false;
        return i == ((Obj)other).i;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return i;
    }
}

Then, you can use if(o1.equals(o2)) {. However, this is not really a good example, read this (link) for more information.

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1  
Please also override hashCode(). Not doing it is a bug. –  JB Nizet Jan 1 '13 at 20:55
1  
@JBNizet that's why I said However, this is not really a good example –  Doorknob Jan 1 '13 at 20:56
1  
@JBNizet ok, done –  Doorknob Jan 1 '13 at 21:00

== returns true only if you are comparing the same object [i.e. the same memory location].

If you want to compare objects by their fields, you have to overload the equals() method, in order to induce an equivalence relation over them.

public boolean equals(Object other){

    return this.i == other.i;

}

Be sure that the equals() method respects reflexivity, symmmetry, transitivity.

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moonwave99 typed faster than me. this is a good tutorial for overloading equals. –  Levi Jan 1 '13 at 20:51
2  
Please also override hashCode(). Not doing it is a bug. –  JB Nizet Jan 1 '13 at 20:55

== compares the reference equality, i.e if they refer to the same object in the memory.

You need to override equals() method, and use it whenever you want to compare their values. Also, override hashCode() which is used by HashMap for example.

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The == operator does not check for equality in class data; rather, it checks to see if they are the same location in memory. If you did o2 = o1 instead of initializing them the same way, they would be the same location in memory, so o2==o1 would return true. However, since they were initialized some separately, it returns false. Instead, you should define an equals method and implement that.

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