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Replacements for switch statement in python?

Given this method :

def getIndex(index):
    if((index) < 10):
        return 5
    elif(index < 100):
        return 4
    elif(index < 1000):
        return 3
    elif(index < 10000):
        return 2
    elif(index < 100000):
        return 1
    elif(index < 1000000):
        return 0

I want to make it in a switch-case style , however , Python doesn't support switch case .

Any replacements for that ?

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marked as duplicate by Josh Caswell, Brooks Moses, Stony, competent_tech, Bertrand Marron Jan 2 '13 at 1:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/60208/… - Check this out! :) –  limelights Jan 1 '13 at 20:51
    
You can use if instead of elif everywhere in this code. –  Lev Levitsky Jan 1 '13 at 20:51
    
The reason Python doesn't have switch is that it's really, internally, exactly like your series of elif statements. Using the elif is essentially the same and more obvious what the logic is. It is already the preferred syntax for Python. There is no reason to change it. –  Keith Jan 1 '13 at 20:56
    
See answers to the question switch case in python doesn't work; need another pattern. –  martineau Jan 2 '13 at 0:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

what about 6-len(str(index))?

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In this particular instance I would just use maths:

def get_index(index):
    return 6 - int(round(math.log(index, 10)))

You have to use the built-in function round as math.log returns a float.

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the classic pythonic way is to use a dictionary where the keys are your tests and the values are callable functions that reflect what you intend to do:

def do_a():
    print "did a"

self do_b():
    print " did b"

#... etc

opts = {1:do_a, 2:do_b}

if value in opts: 
    opts[value]()
else:
    do_some_default()
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